Mt. McCoy Trail in Simi Valley

The Mt. McCoy Trail is located on the west side of Simi Valley with a trailhead at the corner of Washburn Street and Los Amigos Avenue (off the west end of Royal Avenue).

The trailhead at the corner of Washburn St and Los Amigos Avenue

The trailhead at the corner of Washburn St and Los Amigos Avenue

The Mt. McCoy trail is distinctive as there is a large white cross at the top of the mountain, which is about a 600 or so foot climb. From the trailhead, go straight and then take the switchbacks up the mountain.

At this first juncture, keep going straight (south) to the switchbacks. Turn right and you'll be going straight up the steep hill, like we did the first time.

At this first juncture, keep going straight (south) to the switchbacks. Turn right and you'll be going straight up the steep hill, like we did the first time.

Actually, after just a few hundred feet from the Washburn/Los Amigos trailhead, you'll reach a juncture where you either go straight (which is correct) or take a trail to the right, which is much steeper, but a much more direct path to the top. We made the mistake of taking that path the first time and it got us right up to the cross, but it is pretty steep.

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The trails here are all really nicely groomed, thanks to the Rancho Simi Trailblazers and RSRPD. There are dozens of "shortcuts" along the trail but try to stick to the main path. Taking the correct path, with its switchbacks and twists and turns, is a bit over a mile to the top of Mt. McCoy, where you will be treated to panoramic views of the entire Simi Valley and the other direction towards the Reagan Library.  In fact, there are paths from the top that take you in other directions, including  a fire road that intersects with Presidential Drive to the Reagan Library.

View of the cross from about halfway up

View of the cross from about halfway up

A couple benches at the top of the hill to take in the beautiful views

A couple benches at the top of the hill to take in the beautiful views

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The Rancho Simi Recreation and Park District owns 200 acres surrounding Mt. McCoy and the Rancho Simi Trailblazers helped construct the nicely maintained trail. Learn more at www.rsrpd.org/park/mtmccoytrail/mtmccoytrail.html.

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Looking down from the cross to the south, where the benches and trailhead are

Looking down from the cross to the south, where the benches and trailhead are

Westlake Lake in Westlake Village

Westlake Lake is a 125 acre lake with 8 miles of shoreline in Westlake Village. Over 1,300 homes are located on the lake or are within access of it. It is a man-made lake that was completed in 1969 at a cost of $3.5 million.  A number of homes are located on an island in the lake that is connected by La Venta ("The Bridge") Road.

View of Westlake Lake from southwest side on Triunfo Canyon Road. The Landing is on the left side.

View of Westlake Lake from southwest side on Triunfo Canyon Road. The Landing is on the left side.

While Westlake Lake is a private lake maintained for Westlake Village residents by the Westlake Lake Management Association, you can still enjoy its beauty in many ways. Running, cycling and walking around the lake via Triunfo Canyon and other adjacent streets is quite popular. Or visit The Landing (32129 Lindero Canyon) on the southwest side of the lake to enjoy a meal at one of several lakefront restaurants (such as Boccacio's and Zin Bistro Americana). Or just stroll around, taking in the sweeping view and serenity.

View from the southwest side of the Lake while cycling on Lindero Canyon Road.

The lake is stocked with bass but fishing and boating is restricted to Westlake Village residents with guests and permits. So if you don't live there, start making some Westlake Village friends!

Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza

The Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza is one of the largest performing arts center between Los Angeles and San Francisco at over 200,000 square feet.

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The City of Thousand Oaks Cultural Affairs Department oversees theatre productions for the Civic Arts Plaza, which encompasses two theatres – the 1,800-seat Fred Kavli Theatre and the 394-seat Janet and Ray Scherr Forum Theatre. The Plaza originally opened in 1994.

The performing arts center combines outstanding arts and entertainment with state-of-the-art technology and acoustics. Over 200,000 patrons and 35,000 children attend more than 350 performances annually. The Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza is funded through a unique public/private partnership between the City of Thousand Oaks and the Alliance for the Arts.

Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza
Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza

There is something for everyone at this venue....musicals, cabaret, Broadway musicals, dance, concerts, big bands, the New West Symphony, ballet, plays, well known speakers and events for the kids.  In front of the plaza is the Mary and Richard Carpenter plaza park.

Next door to the Plaza is The Lakes of Thousand Oaks, another great place to take the kids.

Between 1926 and 1968 the Plaza location housed the 170 acre Goebel's Lion Farm (later called Jungleland), where many of the famous wild animals in Hollywood pictures lived.  There were elephants, lions, tigers, hippos, you name it.  Leo, the MGM lion, Mr. Ed the Talking Horse, and Getta, Tarzan's chimpanzee all lived there at some point.  Jungleland was a major draw in its day that played a large role in making Thousand Oaks what it is today.

A photo of Jungleland after it closed in 1969 (Image courtesy of Conejo Through the Lens, Thousand Oaks Library)

A photo of Jungleland after it closed in 1969 (Image courtesy of Conejo Through the Lens, Thousand Oaks Library)

The Civic Arts Plaza is located at 2100 E. Thousand Oaks Boulevard (take the 101 East, left on Rancho exit, right on T.O. Blvd, and turn right into parking structure at Dallas Drive.  Visit www.civicartsplaza.com for more information or call 805.449.2787.

It takes good luck and timing for a novice photographer like me to capture the Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza while driving south on the 101 freeway.

It takes good luck and timing for a novice photographer like me to capture the Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza while driving south on the 101 freeway.

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Disneyland Park in Anaheim

Everyone knows about Disneyland Park (originally called just Disneyland) in Anaheim, so here in this post we will summarize some key tidbits about this amusement park.

Disneyland Park and sister theme park Disneyland California Adventure together form Disneyland Resort, along with three hotels (Disneyland Hotel, Disney's Grand Californian Hotel & Spa and Disney's Paradise Pier Hotel) and Downtown Disney, an outdoor shopping and restaurant area connecting the theme parks and hotels.

Disneyland Park Sections (or "Lands")

Disneyland is divided into the following "lands," or themed sections: Main Street, U.S.A., Adventureland, New Orleans Square, Frontierland, Critter Country, Fantasyland, Mickey's Toontown and Tomorrowland.  Ground breaking for a new section, "Star Wars Land," began in April 2016. Star Wars Land will encompass 14 acres when completed at a future date.

The eight existing lands occupy 85 acres. The original lands when Disneyland opened on July 17, 1955 were Main Street U.S.A, Adventureland, Frontierland, Fantasyland and Tomorrowland. Later on came New Orleans Square (1966), Bear Country (later changed to Critter Country) in 1972 and Mickey's Toontown in 1993.

The "lost" land is Holidayland, which opened in 1957, a 9 acre area with a circus and baseball diamond, that closed in 1961. (Good to know this, trivia buffs!)

Disneyland Park Attractions by Land

Visit touringplans.com/disneyland-resort/closures for updates on rides that are closed for renovation.

Main Street U.S.A: The Disney Gallery, The Disneyland Story presenting Great Moments with Mr. Lincoln, Main Street Cinema and Main Street Vehicles (turn of the 20th century vehicles)

Adventureland: Enchanted Tiki Room, Indiana Jones Adventure, Jungle Cruise, Tarzan's Treehouse

Critter Country: Davy Crockett's Explorer Canoes, The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh, Splash Mountain (NOTE: As of October 2016, all attractions closed for refurbishment)

Frontierland: Big Thunder Mountain Railroad, Frontierland Shootin' Expedition, Mark Twain Riverboat, Pirate's Lair on Tom Sawyer Island, Sailing Ship Columbia

Fantasyland: Alice in Wonderland, Casey Jr. Circus Train, Dumbo the Flying Elephant, King Arthur Carrousel (yes, it is spelled with two r's), Mad Tea Party, Matterhorn Bobsleds, Mr. Toad's Wild Ride, Peter Pan's Flight, Pinocchio's Daring Journey, Sleeping Beauty Castle Walkthrough, Snow White's Scary Adventures, Storybook Land Canal Boats, it's a small world

Mickey's Toontown: Chip 'n Dale Treehouse, Donald's Boat, Gadget's Go Coaster, Goofy's Playhouse, Mickey's House and Meet Mickey, Minnie's House, Roger Rabbit's Car Toon Spin

New Orleans Square: Haunted Mansion, Pirates of the Caribbean

Tomorrowland: Astro Orbitor, Autopia, Buzz Lightyear Astro Blasters, Disneyland Monorail, Finding Nemo Submarine Voyage, Space Mountain Ghost Galaxy, Star Tours - The Adventures Continue, Star Wars Launch Bay, Star Wars: Path of the Jedi

Various Areas: Disneyland Railroad (closed for refurbishment; to re-open Summer 2017)

Character Experiences and Live Entertainment

There are various opportunities to meet Disney characters throughout the park. Visit disneyland.disney.go.com/entertainment/#/character-experiences for details. And for live entertainment opportunities, visit disneyland.disney.go.com/entertainment.

Pricing

Retail pricing is as follows as of mid-November 2016 and of course is subject to change for 

  • 1-Day, 1 Park: Varies from $95 (Value) to $105 (Regular) to $119 (Peak) (For Ages 10+; Ages 3 to 9 are about $6 less per ticket)
  • 2-Day, 1 Park Per Day: $195 or Park Hopper $235
  • 3-Day, 1 Park Per day: $255 or Park Hopper $295
  • 4-Day, 1 Park Per Day: $280 or Park Hopper $320
  • 5-Day, 1 Park Per Day: $295 or Park Hopper $335
  • Annual Passports: There are 5 to choose from and they vary from $329 to $1,049 per year. The $1,049 Disney Signature Plus Passport gets you in to both park every day of the year.
  • One Day Parking: $18

Learn more at disneyland.disney.go.com.

A.J. Comstock Fire Museum in Ventura

The A.J. Comstock Fire Museum is located in the Figueroa Street Mall one block pedestrian section between E. Main Street and E. Santa Clara Street in Downtown Ventura.

You don't actually walk through this museum; you look through the windows and are treated to a display of vintage items, including equipment and photographs that document the history of the Ventura County Fire Department.

The museum was dedicated to retired fire chief A.J. Comstock, who served the community for 33 years, from 1940 to 1973. 

The Figueroa Street Mall is located on the west end of the Downtown Ventura area, adjacent to Mission Park and the Museum of Ventura County directly west of it and the San Buenaventura Mission directly across from it on Main Street.

This block is also home to the San Buenaventura China Alley Memorial. A Chinese community was established on this block in the 1870s. Chinese merchants, laborers, farmers, cooks, laundrymen, gardeners and servants did business here and lived in small homes. These early settlers maintained their language and customs and rituals in this small enclave. The acclaimed Chinese Fire Brigade was formed here, often the first line of defense at local fires. 

Other contributions of the Chinese immigrants to the community included a water flume above the San Buenaventura Aqueduct along Ventura Avenue and the Chinese Fire Brigade that served China Alley and the surrounding neighborhood. The Chinese Brigade was often the first fire company at the site of a fire and was instrumental in saving many structures in the downtown area. During the early days of immigration, the people of San Buenaventura welcomed their new Chinese neighbors as an inexpensive source of labor. However, with the incorporation of strict national immigration laws in the early 20th century, a hostile environment forced the residents of China Alley to relocate to other areas.

The immigrants dispersed from the area in the early 20th century when immigration laws became more exclusionary and settlers moved away, either back to China or to neighboring areas. The City of San Buenaventura and the Ventura County Chinese American Historical Society dedicated a memorial to these settlers in August 2004.

The Figueroa Street Mall

The Figueroa Street Mall

Los Robles Trail West "Space Mountain"

"Space Mountain" is not the "official" name of the Los Robles Trail heading west from the South Moorpark Road and Greenmeadow Avenue in Thousand Oaks trail access point but this mostly single track trail was affectionately named after the Disneyland ride due to its switchbacks and twists and turns to the top, where you will be rewarded with outstanding views of the Conejo Valley and beyond. These trails are particularly popular with mountain bikers who enjoy the rocky, single track trails, as well as hikers and runners.

From the main trailhead, go west just under 1/2 mile and you'll see the fork in the road where you can go east or west. Go west, young man (or woman).

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After making your way up the hill to the right, you'll go down a hill to another fork in the road, where you can either veer slightly right to to the Spring Canyon Trail, which takes you about a mile to the Ventu Park area of Newbury Park. Veer to the left to continue on the Los Robles Trail West.

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Only 4.7 miles from this juncture is the Rancho Sierra Vista/Satwiwa National Park area in Newbury Park. Some challenging miles for sure, but fun!

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This section of the Los Robles Trail is mostly single track although some sections you can walk two-wide (though you'd best not do so, as there are many mountain bikes on these trails). Good to be aware of others on the trail.

I've attempted from time to time to count the number of switchbacks on my way up to the top of Space Mountain and back down and come up with something in the neighborhood of 8 to 10 of them. This is not a stroller friendly trail as it is steep, with plenty or rocks jutting out. An easy trail to twist your ankle if you're not careful.

A photo of a section of the Los Robles Trail West up Space Mountain

A photo of a section of the Los Robles Trail West up Space Mountain

It is roughly 3 miles to the top, where you will find one bench directly on the trail, facing a very short path to a viewing area with another bench.

Bench on the trail at the top of "Space Mountain" on the Los Robles Trail

Bench on the trail at the top of "Space Mountain" on the Los Robles Trail

The viewing bench at the very top of Space Mountain

The viewing bench at the very top of Space Mountain

The viewing bench at the very top of Space MountainAll told, this is roughly about 3.5 miles each way, or 7 miles round trip.

Los Robles Trail sign at the top of Space Mountain

Los Robles Trail sign at the top of Space Mountain

Views from the top of Space Mountain looking west toward the Conejo Grade

Los Robles Trail sign at the top of Space MountainViews from the top of Space Mountain looking west toward the Conejo GradeAnd as mentioned above, you can continue west on the Los Robles Trail west into Newbury Park. Portions of the trail go through privately owned land, which the owner has generously made available for public trail access...so be sure to treat the trail with respect!

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And last but not least, a view of the single track trail heading towards Newbury Park, where you will eventually connect with the Angel Vista Peak trail.

Single track with awesome, continuous views as you continue west into Newbury Park

Single track with awesome, continuous views as you continue west into Newbury Park

U.S. Navy Seabee Museum - NBVC Port Hueneme

U.S. Navy Seabee Museum - NBVC Port Hueneme

The U.S. Navy Seabee Museum is one of the Navy's eleven official museums. Its mission is to select, collect, preserve, and display historical material relating to the history of the Naval Construction Force, better known as the Seabees, and the U.S. Navy Civil Engineer Corps.

The second oldest of the official Navy museums, the Seabee Museum was established in 1947 in Port Hueneme, which today is part of Naval Base Ventura County.

The Seabee Museum was recently renovated and is quite a beautiful, state-of-art facility. The 38,000 square foot museum features modern exhibit spaces, memorial garden, theater, education room

Read More

Corriganville Park in Simi Valley

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Corriganville Park is a historical 206 acre park located at 7001 Smith Road in Simi Valley that is owned and operated by the Rancho Simi Recreation and Park District. The park has over four miles of hiking, biking and equestrian trails, sandstone cliffs, an oak forest, seasonal stream, shaded picnic areas, Camp Rotary Youth Campground, picnic shelter and more.

The park is named after Ray "Crash" Corrigan, a stuntman/actor who owned the park from 1937 to 1965, when over 3,500 movies, TV shows and commercials were filmed there. In 1949, the Corrigan Movie Ranch opened as a Western-style amusement park with a train ride and stagecoach ride that in the late 1950s had greater weekend attendance than Disneyland and Knott's Berry Farm.

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Bob Hope bought the property in 1965 and renamed it Hopetown, but filming stopped after a year. The ranch burned down in the 1970s and all that is left are the cement slabs and exterior rock walls of the barn. You've got to visit the Santa Susana Depot Museum around the corner from Corriganville and see the model of what Corriganville looked like in 1960, then visit the park to see the slabs and imagine what it was like back then.

There is an interpretative trail at Corriganville with 20 markers that provide information about the vegetation and surroundings as well as some of the history. Visit www.rsrpd.org/simi_valley/parks/corriganville_park.php for a link to pdf brochures with information about the history and trails of the park. Or call 805.584.4400.

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Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum

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A local must-see is the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum, located at 40 Presidential Drive, Simi Valley.  With sweeping hilltop views of the surrounding valleys, this 100,000+ sq ft museum on 100 acres is incredible and quite interesting for all ages.  There is a wealth of memorabilia and artifacts from throughout Reagan's life on display. 

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In February 2011, over 26,000 sq ft of new exhibits and dozens of interactive displays spanning Reagan's life were introduced.  There are 24 galleries that pay tribute to our 40th President's life. You can act in a movie with Reagan, deliver his inaugural address with a teleprompter, set the table for a state dinner, learn about his economic policies in interactive games, read his handwritten diary, ride a horse alongside Reagan at Rancho del Cielo, and much more. There is also a full-scale Oval Office replica and a 9 1/2 foot, 6,300 lb section of the Berlin Wall on display.

Volunteer docents are very friendly, helpful and extremely knowledgeable, they are there to help guide you through your visit and answer your questions.

Exhibits as of July 2016 include: Intro Theater, Foundations of a Leader, GE Theater, Governor Years, Victory & Inauguration, Assassination Attempt, The Oval Office, First Lady, Berlin Wall, Rebuilding America, Threat Theater, Peace Through Strength, Summits, American Heroes, Ranch & Camp David, Post Presidency, Mourning Ronald Reagan, Legacy Theater, National Treasures Gallery, Mary Jane Wick Gallery (Special Exhibits) and the Air Force One Pavillion (1st Level: Marine One, 2nd Level: History of the Flying White House, Presidential Motorcade, 3rd Level: Flights of Freedom, Air Force One Theater, Board Air Force One). Outside is a decommissioned F-14 Tomcat, a replica of the White House Rose Garden, a piece of the Berlin Wall and President Reagan's Memorial Site.

The Air Force One Pavilion opened in October 2005.  It features the actual Air Force One aircraft used from 1973 to 2001 and you can walk through aircraft when you visit the museum.  There are also motorcade vehicles, helicopter and other items on display. Check out the video to see how stunning this pavilion is.

In addition to the permanent exhibits discussed above, there are always temporary exhibits on display. Check out the museum's website for details.

Dine at the Reagan Library! Reagan's Country Cafe offers panoramic views and is open to the public from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily, 7 days a week. You can access the cafe without entering the Museum. The Ronald Reagan Pub is located inside the Air Force One Pavilion and offers drinks and pre-packaged sandwiches and other items.

The museum is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. except Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year's Day. Parking is free of charge. Current admission costs as of November 2016 are $21 for ages 18 to 61, $18 ages 62+, $15 ages 11 to 17 and $10 for ages 3 to 10. Children 2 and under are free. More information at www.reaganfoundation.org or by calling 805.577.4000.

Ventura Flea Market - Ventura County Fairgrounds

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The Ventura Flea Market is held near the ocean in Ventura and is a great place to shop. The event features antiques, used and new merchandise sold by over 500 vendors, more than 5,000 buyers visit the Market each time it is held. 

The Ventura Flea Market is held from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Ventura County Fairgrounds. A special Early Bird admission is available from 6am to 9am at $10.00 per person. Regular admission starts at 9 a.m. at $5.00 per person. Children under 12 are admitted free when accompanied by an adult.  (Prices current as of January 2016.) Pets are not allowed. Event is held rain or shine! Parking is $5.

Upcoming Dates as of 11/1/16

  • November 20, 2016
  • January 29, 2017
  • March 26, 2017
  • April 23, 2017
  • June 4, 2017
  • September 24, 2017
  • November 5, 2017

Visit www.rgcshows.com/Ventura.aspx or call 323.560.SHOW (7469) for more information.

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Comedy & Cocktails at Studio Channel Islands in Camarillo

Comedy & Cocktails at Studio Channel Islands, 2222 Ventura Blvd, Camarillo take place one Friday night each month. Tickets $15. Beer and wine are both $5. Features local comedy icon Jason Love and several top notch comedians who will make you laugh yourself silly.

Visit studiochannelislands.org/events/comedy-cocktails for more information.

Park View Trail in Dos Vientos Section of Newbury Park

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The Park View Trail is a short little 1/2 mile trail adjacent to Dos Vientos Community Park in Newbury Park. There are two main access points. There is a trailhead near the corner of Rancho Dos Vientos and Via Rincon at the southwest corner of the park, and there is another trailhead on Via Ricardo, one block east of Via Pisa.

Views of Dos Vientos Community Park from the Park View Trail.

Views of Dos Vientos Community Park from the Park View Trail.

This short hike is perfect with the kids as it is not too strenuous and is adjacent to the park. Good for a quick getaway. There's also at least one geocache on this trail that's pretty cool.

Moderate trail it is. Not too steep, yet not completely flat.

Moderate trail it is. Not too steep, yet not completely flat.

View of the Edison power lines going up Conejo Mountain from Park View Trail.

View of the Edison power lines going up Conejo Mountain from Park View Trail.

Nice quick access to views of the park, Dos Vientos, the Powerline Trail and beyond. And speaking of the Powerline trail, the trailhead is directly across the street from the west end of the trail.

Trailhead on west side of Park View Trail off of Via Ricardo

Trailhead on west side of Park View Trail off of Via Ricardo

Interested in other Dos Vientos trails? Learn about the El Rincon, El Cerro and Las Brisas trails and the nearby (access point just south on Via Ricardo) Vista Del Mar Trail.

Santa Rosa Loop Hike in Wildwood Park

The Santa Rosa Loop Hike in Wildwood Park in Thousand Oaks is a 6 1/2 mile loop with some moderately challenging uphills and downhills that enables you to take in some beautiful views of the Conejo Valley and Santa Rosa Valley.

Start at the main Wildwood trailhead at the west end of Avenida de Los Arboles. Start your adventure on the main Mesa Trail towards Lizard Rock. You'll soon reach the following sign and make your way up the Santa Rosa Trail

Box Canyon Loop Trail

With some moderate trekking you'll soon have some nice views of Wildwood Park, the Conejo Valley and the Boney Mountain Range off in the distance. 

As your crest the hill, follow the arrows toward the Lower Santa Rosa Trail.

As your crest the hill, follow the arrows toward the Lower Santa Rosa Trail.

Already at this point you're treated to a continuous view of the beautiful Santa Rosa Valley

Already at this point you're treated to a continuous view of the beautiful Santa Rosa Valley

So you're heading east and almost feeling like maybe you're getting lost, but this indeed is the Santa Rosa Trail. Just stay towards the left. It is single track much of the way over here. Then, you'll see the following sign as you get closer to the bottom of the Santa Rosa Valley.

So now you are zig zagging down the Shooting Star Trail, which eventually merges into the Lower Santa Rosa Trail.

Now you're going to turn left (west) on Lower Santa Rosa Trail for some gentle slopes alongside private residences and farms in the Santa Rosa Valley for about a mile or so.

Some old farming equipment on the side of the Lower Santa Rosa Trail

Some old farming equipment on the side of the Lower Santa Rosa Trail

Then soon you come to the end of the trail and there's a sign that tells you to get back into Wildwood Park via the Box Canyon Trail, take the road up ahead 4/10ths of a mile. You're actually in Camarillo now on Rocky High Road.

The trail ends at the juncture of Talal Ct (private) and Rocky High Road.

The trail ends at the juncture of Talal Ct (private) and Rocky High Road.

At the end of the short stretch of road is the trailhead back into Wildwood Park.

And soon you'll see the Box Canyon Trail sign. Veer left (although I think if you go right it loops around to the main trail also).

Box Canyon Trail Sign

It's about a 300 foot climb over less than half a mile up the Box Canyon Trail that gets you back to the main Mesa Trail artery in Wildwood Park. Take your time...you're almost there!

Box Canyon Lizard Rock Sign Wildwood Park

Then you'll see the Lizard Rock / Box Canyon sign that signifies you are back at the Mesa Trail to head about half a mile back to the parking lot. Or turn right to check out the views from Lizard Rock before you go.

To see a map of this hike, visit www.cosf.org/website/html/santa-rosa-loop.html.

OK, so if you're looking to take a break and sit back and enjoy the view near the juncture of the Mesa Trail and Box Canyon Trail?  Then head back (west) from the "Lizard Rock/Box Canyon" trail sign above toward Box Canyon and take the trail on the left to the Box Canyon Overlook, where you will find the following place to park your rear end. Not a bad view, eh?

Bench at Box Canyon Overlook

Bench at Box Canyon Overlook