Reminder About How to Deal with Coyotes in the Conejo Valley and Surrounding Areas

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Living in the Conejo Valley, surrounded by thousands of acres of open space, most of us come into contact with coyotes from time to time. Coyotes are a vital component of rural and urban communities, deserving of respect for their adaptability, resilience and intelligence. Below are some tips on coyote awareness, courtesy of Project Coyote.

Facts:

  • Coyotes are members of the dog family; they are curious, adaptable, and learn quickly.
  • Coyotes often mate for life, are devoted parents, and are highly communicative (barks, yips, howls).
  • Coyotes weigh 18-35 pounds in the West.
  • Coyotes may be more protective of dens/territories during pup rearing (April-Aug).
  • Coyotes eat large numbers of rodents and rabbits, as well as fruit, vegetation, insects and carrion. They help keep ecosystems vital, healthy and clean.
  • Coyotes are naturally wary of people but can adapt to our presence and the reliable food sources that we provide.
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Safety:

  • DON’T FEED COYOTES. Their life and your safety depend on coyotes remaining wild and naturally wary of people.
  • Remove attractants; pick up trash, secure garbage, and feed pets inside. Don’t leave food or pets outside at night.
  • Walk dogs on leashes, especially during pup rearing season (April-Aug). Pick up your small dog if you see a coyote and don’t let pets roam.
  • If approached, don’t run. Wave arms, make noise and walk toward the coyote until he retreats. Be “Big, Bad and Loud.”
  • Avoid areas where coyotes may be denning or feeding/hiding pups.
  • Appreciate coyotes from a distance. Share this information with family and friends.
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