Upcoming Events at California Lutheran University in Thousand Oaks

Upcoming Events at California Lutheran University
60 W. Olsen Road, Thousand Oaks

“Traces: Revealing Secrets in Art and History”

Tuesday, Nov. 27, through Thursday, Feb. 21

William Rolland Gallery of Fine Art

In this eclectic exhibition, presented in partnership with California Lutheran University’s “Chemical Investigations of Art” class, we re-examine works of art to uncover what might be hiding in plain sight, or just below the surface. Whether it is the application of science or the science of connoisseurship, many works from various collections have been altered by their longevity or purposefully manipulated. Today, scientific methods allow us to uncover forgeries, predict aging, attribute work to a specific artist, preserve ailing pieces and restore works closer to their original state. This exhibit offers a behind-the-scenes look at the procedures and techniques art “detectives” use to investigate what secrets artworks hold, using infrared X-rays and solvents that remove varnish. See side-by-side comparisons of before and after images, or try your hand to see if you can identify what has been altered. Note: This exhibition features the optional use of ultraviolet light.

The exhibit features works by John Sell Cotman, Susan MacDowell Eakins, Robert Henri Fouques, Marion Greenwood, Eastman Johnson, William Keith, Endre Komaromi-Kacz, Georges Michel, Mary Jane Peale, Dona Simons, Worthington Thomas Whittredge, Richard Wilson and the school of Frans Hals.

Support, technical advice and loans were provided by Cal Lutheran chemistry professor Katherine Hoffmann, Ann Bittl of Ventura College, Safwat Mohamed Sayed Aly of the Grand Egyptian Museum, Scott M. Haskins of Fine Art Conservation Laboratories, Gerald Zwers of Public Art Services and the Lou Grubb Collection.

For more information, contact curator Rachel T. Schmid at 805-493-3697 or visit CalLutheran.edu.

“Garment Girl” by Jennifer Vanderpool

Friday, Jan. 18, through Thursday, Feb. 28

Artist walk-through: Tuesday, Feb. 12, 4 p.m.

Kwan Fong Gallery of Art and Culture

Artist presentation: Thursday, Jan. 31, 4 p.m. in William Rolland Art Center 213

A California Lutheran University faculty member’s art exhibit exploring the textile industry and labor activism is coming to the Thousand Oaks campus after opening in Vietnam.

“Garment Girl” by adjunct art faculty member Jennifer Vanderpool interlaces Vanderpool’s own matrilineal family stories of struggle with current labor activism, evoking questions about the global textile industry and the unseen toil of garment workers in sweatshops. Her immigrant grandmother reminisced about working as a cook in a sweatshop in the Allegheny Mountains, and her mother told her stories about sewing shirt collars to pay her college tuition.

“Garment Girl” features photographic prints, textiles and videos of Vietnamese refugees in Los Angeles sweatshops and female textile laborers in Hanoi, Vietnam, telling their stories. Vanderpool also conducted interviews with scholars and activists in both locations.The exhibit opened in May at Heritage Space in Hanoi.

A native of the Mahoning Valley in Northeast Ohio, Vanderpool works across mediums to reveal relationships between physical landscapes and the forces that shape them, knitting together narratives about forgotten institutions, people and communities.

A community arts activist, Vanderpool has examined environmental issues and the floriculture industry in past installations. Her exhibits have been displayed in Colombia, Denmark, Ecuador, Hungary, Mexico, Norway, Russia, Sweden and Ukraine and throughout the United States.

Vanderpool has received exhibition funding from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, the Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs, Kunstrådet: Danish Arts Council, Kulturrådet: Swedish Arts Council, and Malmö Stad. She received National Endowment for the Arts grants for her community art outreach in Isla Vista and her curatorial work exploring the interconnections between radical art practices and social activism. She has an independent interdisciplinary doctorate in art critical practices from the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Admission to the exhibit and events is free. Kwan Fong Gallery is open to the public from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday. It is located in Soiland Humanities Center at 120 Memorial Parkway. The Rolland Art Center is located at 3350 Campus Drive. For more information, contact curator Rachel T. Schmid at 805-493-3697 or rtschmid@callutheran.edu or visit CalLutheran.edu/kwanfong.

History Lecture Series

A Thousand and One Years Ago: 1000 CE

"Courtiers, Warriors and Rebellion”

Sam Claussen, Ph.D., History

Wednesday, Jan. 23, 7-8:30 p.m.

Lundring Events Center

In the 2018-19 series, members of the Cal Lutheran history and art faculty explore what life was like a millennium ago – about 1000 CE. Was it the Dark Ages? The Islamic Golden Age? The Heian Period? Was it all of these?

Admission is free. Sponsored by Cal Lutheran and the Thousand Oaks Grant R. Brimhall Library. Funded by the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation Grant for “Lyceum: Humanities and Beyond!” For information, contact Cindy Keitel at ckeitel@callutheran.edu.

Lunchtime Organ Recital Series

Joseph Peeples

Friday, Feb. 1, 12:30–1 p.m.

Samuelson Chapel

University organist Joseph Peeples will showcase the 2,109-pipe Borg Petersen Memorial Organ in 30-minute recitals on the first Friday of each month. Works performed will be of a varied character and suited to all. Audience members are welcome to bring a lunch and quietly enjoy the recital.

Admission is free. For information, call Campus Ministry at 805-493-3228 or visit CalLutheran.edu/music.

Faculty Recital

Heidi Vass

“The Sacred and the Sublime”

Friday, Feb. 1, 7:30 p.m.

Samuelson Chapel

Soprano Heidi Vass, pianist Eric Kinsley and guests perform a vocal recital featuring J.S. Bach’s Cantata 82a, Maurice Ravel’s “Deux mélodies hébraïques” and Olivier Messiaen’s “Vocalise.”

Donations accepted. For information, call the Music Department at 805-493-3306 or visit CalLutheran.edu/music.

“A Conversation with Melina Abdullah”

Tuesday, Feb. 5, 4:30 p.m.

Samuelson Chapel

Melina Abdullah is a womanist scholar-activist who sees her role as intrinsically linked to struggles for the liberation of oppressed people. She spearheaded the effort to make ethnic studies a requirement in the Los Angeles Unified School District. Among the original organizers who convened to form Black Lives Matter, she serves as a Los Angeles chapter lead and contributes to the national leadership.

Abdullah has been recognized as one of the 10 most influential Los Angeles leaders by LA Weekly, as Urban Girl of the Year by 2UrbanGirls, and as one of the 15 Fiercest Sisters of 2015 by Fierce. She has appeared on MSNBC, CNN, TV One, ABC, PBS, KTLA, KCET, BET, Free Speech TV, Al Jazeera and the podcast “Lovett or Leave It.” She is also featured in the Academy Award–nominated documentary “13th” and the films “When Justice Isn’t Just” and “Justice or Else.” Abdullah is a professor and chair of Pan-African Studies at California State University, Los Angeles.

Admission is free. Sponsored by the Sarah W. Heath Center for Equality and Justice, the Campus Diversity Initiative and the College of Arts and Sciences. For information, contact the CEJ at 805-493-3694 or cej@callutheran.edu.

Book Release Party

Jacqueline Lyons

Thursday, Feb. 7, 4-5:30 p.m.

William Rolland Gallery of Fine Art

Come celebrate Cal Lutheran English professor Jacqueline Lyons’ new book of poetry, “Adorable Airport.” Lyons’ other books include “Earthquake Daily,” “The Way They Say Yes Here,” which won a Peace Corps Writers Best Poetry Book Award, “Lost Colony” and a collection of essays, “Breakdown of Poses.” She is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Poetry Fellowship, Utah Arts Council Awards in poetry and nonfiction, and a Nevada Arts Council Fellowship in nonfiction.

Admission is free. Books will be available for purchase at the reception. Sponsored by the English Department. For information, contact Lyons at jlyons@callutheran.edu.

Nordic Spirit Symposium

“Vikings, Sagas and Runestones: New Findings Change History”

Friday evening, Feb. 8, and Saturday, Feb. 9

Many exciting Viking-era discoveries have been made by archaeologists in recent years, giving a new understanding of the Viking Age. Viking boat burials in Estonia that pre-date the “beginning” of the Viking Age in 793 A.D., genomic proof that a skeleton in a Swedish chamber grave filled with Viking weaponry is a female’s, a fifth ring fortress in Denmark, a Viking Age city beneath Oxford, England, a Harald Bluetooth treasure trove in northern Germany, a long-sought Irish Viking settlement, and the Viking Galloway hoard in Scotland are some of the exciting discoveries this symposium will explore. In addition, Icelandic sagas will be treated in two ways new to the symposium series on the Cal Lutheran campus – a live drama presentation of “The Saga of Gudridur” and discussion of putting the sagas to film, illustrated with film clips representing the “Saga of Gisli the Outlaw.”

Performers and speakers include Thorunn Clausen, an Icelandic actress trained at the Webber Douglas Academy of Dramatic Art, London, and Complete Vocal Institute, Copenhagen; Samuel Claussen, assistant professor of history, Cal Lutheran; Ágúst Gudmundsson, film director, Iceland; Neil Price, distinguished professor of archaeology, University of Uppsala, Sweden; and Henrik Williams, professor of Scandinavian languages, University of Uppsala.

Reservations are requested for the $15 Friday reception and required by Jan. 31 for the $40 dinner on Saturday. Admission is $25 for the Friday evening program and $50 for the daylong Saturday program.

The Nordic Spirit Symposium is sponsored by the Scandinavian American Cultural and Historical Foundation and Cal Lutheran and is made possible by generous grants from the Barbro Osher Pro Suecia Foundation and the Norway House Foundation in San Francisco. For the full symposium schedule, visit scandinaviancenter.org. For information, venues and early registration fees, contact Howard Rockstad at 805-497-3717 or hrockstad@gmail.com.

College of Arts and Sciences Dean’s Lecture Series

“Bad News, Good News, Real News, Fake News: Reporting During the Trump Era of ‘Post-truth’”

Laurie Lattimore-Volkmann

Monday, Feb. 25, 3:30–5 p.m.

Lundring Events Center

Laurie Lattimore-Volkmann, a Missouri state government reporter in the early 1990s, has always had an interest in political journalism and its evolution. In her first year as a journalism professor, the Sept. 11 attacks occurred, commencing a dark period. Reporters faced constant attacks from the federal government for being “unpatriotic” if they didn’t hail policies coming from the White House. Since Donald Trump’s arrival in Washington, the press has seen both a renewed public interest in investigative, explanatory political journalism and a White House that often makes claims of “Fake News.”

Lattimore-Volkmann is an adjunct journalism professor at the College of Charleston, where she has taught courses on reporting, media writing, social media management and public relations since 2011. She has also taught at Dominican University of California, Georgia State University and Mercer University.

Admission is free. Sponsored by the College of Arts and Sciences. For information, contact Ana Gorman at agorman@allutheran.edu.

History Lecture Series

A Thousand and One Years Ago: 1000 CE

"Artistic Representations: Manuscripts to Mosaics”

Christine Sellin, Ph.D., Art

Wednesday, Feb. 27, 7-8:30 p.m.

Lundring Events Center

In the 2018-19 series, members of the Cal Lutheran history and art faculty explore what life was like a millennium ago – about 1000 CE. Was it the Dark Ages? The Islamic Golden Age? The Heian Period? Was it all of these?

Admission is free. Sponsored by Cal Lutheran and the Thousand Oaks Grant R. Brimhall Library. Funded by the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation Grant for “Lyceum: Humanities and Beyond!” For information, contact Cindy Keitel at ckeitel@callutheran.edu.

“Artists and Speakers Series

The Great Wall of L.A.: Social and Public Art with Judy Baca”

Wednesday, Feb. 27, 7 p.m.

Preus-Brandt Forum

Judy Baca is a native Angeleno, visual artist, arts activist, community leader and educator best known for her large-scale murals. Her signature piece, “The Great Wall of Los Angeles,” is a cultural landmark and one of the country’s most notable monuments to interracial harmony, produced with the participation of more than 400 youth, 40 ethnic historians and hundreds of community members. In this lecture, Baca discusses art as a tool for social change and self-transformation that involves extensive community dialogue and participation.

Admission is free. Sponsored by the Artists and Speakers Committee, Corey-Everson Endowment, and the Sarah W. Heath Center for Equality and Justice. For information, contact Carlos Castellanos at castellanos@callutheran.edu.

Reel Justice Film Series

“The Blood is at the Doorstep”

Thursday, Feb. 28, 6:30 p.m.

Preus-Brandt Forum

After, a black, unarmed man diagnosed with schizophrenia is shot 14 times and killed by police in Milwaukee, his family embarks on a quest for answers, justice and reform. Filmed over the course of three years in the aftermath of Dontre Hamilton’s death, this intimate documentary follows family members as they channel their grief into community organizing in an attempt to reset the narrative. It offers a painfully realistic glimpse inside a movement born out of tragedy, in what the Hollywood Reporter calls “an urgent report from the front lines of an American crisis.”

A panel discussion with a member of the clergy and the Hamilton family will follow the screening.

Admission is free. Sponsored by the Office of Mission and Identity and Sarah W. Heath Center for Equality and Justice. For information, contact the CEJ at 805-493-3694 or cej@callutheran.edu.