Upcoming Events at California Lutheran University in Thousand Oaks

Upcoming Events at California Lutheran University
60 W. Olsen Road, Thousand Oaks

Nsenga Knight: Other Stars

Friday, Aug. 17, through Thursday, Oct. 11

Kwan Fong Gallery of Art and Culture

“Each of my artistic projects is responding to my self-reflexive question: Who am I and what is my place in this world? My artworks exist as invitations to examine new possibilities that broaden our collective imaginations and challenge traditional boundaries of race, nationhood and religion.” —Nsenga Knight

Knight is a first-generation black American Muslim woman from Brooklyn, and her work is influenced by Islamic geometric art and the black experience. In this exhibit, she works with geometric drawings, text paintings, photographs, oral history recordings and other media. Listen to the enthralling stories of black women in Brooklyn who converted to Islam prior to 1975. Learn about Malcolm X’s pilgrimage to Mecca in 1964, his last religious duty. See how 10th-century astronomical renderings relate to a sociological interpretation of pilgrimage.

Knight received a master’s degree in fine arts from the University of Pennsylvania and has exhibited work at the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston, the Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Art, the New Museum for Contemporary Art and MoMA PS1. She lives and works in Cairo, Egypt.

Admission is free. The Kwan Fong Gallery, located in Soiland Humanities Center, is open to the public 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday. See Page tkt for parking. For information, contact curator Rachel T. Schmid at (805) 493-3697 or visit CalLutheran.edu/kwanfong.

Mapping Meaning: Adventures in Cartography

Friday, Aug. 17, through Tuesday, Nov. 6

William Rolland Gallery of Fine Art

Stashed in glove compartments, accessed on our phones and glowing on the metro, maps show us where to go and what to expect when we get there. The geography they interpret for us is, however, subject to the shaping influences of time and power. Coastlines are altered by rising sea levels, lands are “discovered,” boundaries are disputed and conquered, and cultures are created and erased.

Some maps are statements and some are fanciful. Some are mistaken, inserting an island or angling a lake at odds with reality. All maps reveal perspectives and priorities of the people commissioning or making them.

This exhibit presents a variety of beautiful maps and ways of reading them, along with objects from the times of their creation. Works date from the 16th century to the present, including a collection focusing on Scandinavia, a depiction of California as an island, and maps of the heavens. The works were generously loaned from the Dr. Ernst F. Tonsing Collection. Tonsing will give a related lecture at 4 p.m. Oct. 19 in the Room 212 of the William Rolland Art Center, which is next to the building housing the gallery.

Admission is free. The gallery, located in William Rolland Stadium, is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. For information, contact curator Rachel T. Schmid at 805-493-3697 or rollandgallery@callutheran.edu, or visit CalLutheran.edu/rolland.

Lunchtime Organ Recital Series

Joseph Peeples

Fridays Sept. 28, Oct. 26, Nov. 30, 12:30-1 p.m.

Samuelson Chapel

Adjunct faculty member Joseph Peeples showcases the 2,109-pipe Borg Petersen Memorial Organ in 30-minute recitals on the last Friday of each month. The works performed are of varied character and suited to all. Bring your lunch.

Admission is free. For information, call Campus Ministry at 805-493-3228 or visit CalLutheran.edu/music.

Entrepreneur Speaker Series

Wednesdays, Oct. 3, Nov. 7, Dec. 5 and Jan. 9, 6-8 p.m.

Lundring Events Center

Kinko’s founder Paul Orfalea

Wednesday, Oct. 3, 6-8 p.m.

Lundring Events Center

Kinko’s founder Paul Orfalea will be the October speaker at this monthly event. The Entrepreneur Speakers Series provides an energetic environment where like-minded and passionate people come together to share their ideas and build relationships. Each event begins with networking and a bite to eat followed by a main speaker and discussion. Past speakers have included serial entrepreneur and equity investor Dave Brekus and the founders of Eggology, Urbane Café, Seed&Spark and Blue Microphones.

Admission is free, but registration is required. Sponsored by the School of Management Center for Entrepreneurship. For information, write to som@callutheran.edu. To register, visit CalLutheran.edu/Entrepreneurship.

Reel Justice Film Series: “The Unafraid”

Thursday, Sept. 20, 7 p.m.

Lundring Events Center

“The Unafraid” is a feature-length documentary that follows the personal lives of three DACA students in Georgia, where immigration status prevents them from attending the top state universities and disqualifies them for in-state tuition at other public colleges. Shot in an observational style over a period of four years, this film takes an intimate look at the lives of Alejandro, Silvia and Aldo as they pursue activism and an education and fight for the rights of their families and communities.

Admission is free. Sponsored by the Sarah W. Heath Center for Equality and Justice and the Languages and Cultures Department. For information, contact the CEJ at 805-493-3694 or CEJ@callutheran.edu.

Faculty Recital

Eric Kinsley, piano and harpsichord

Saturday, Sept 22, 7:30 p.m.

Samuelson Chapel

Eric Kinsley will perform a piano and harpsichord recital with fellow members of the music faculty. The musicians will briefly introduce and play rare chamber and solo works of composers such as J.S. Bach, C.P.E. Bach, C.W. Gluck, J.P. Rameau and Arvo Pärt.

Donations accepted. For information, call the Music Department at 805-493-3306 or visit CalLutheran.edu/music.

University Lecture Series

A Thousand and One Years Ago: 1000 CE

Wednesday, Sept. 26, Tuesday, Oct. 23, and Wednesday, Nov. 28, 7-8:30 p.m.

Lundring Events Center

In this series of lectures, with three more to come in the spring of 2019, Cal Lutheran professors will explore what life was like a millennium ago, that is, in about 1000 CE (or A.D.). What age was it? The Dark Ages? The Islamic Golden Age? The Heian Period? All of these and more? Come find out!

Sept. 26: “1000 CE: What Did the Simple Folk Do?” – Michaela Reaves, Ph.D., History

Oct. 23: “Devotion to God: Monks, Saints, Relics, and Pilgrimage” – Steven Shisley, Ph.D., Religion

Nov. 28: “The Turkish Expansion in the Islamic World: Ghazis, Sufis, and Mamluks” – Paul Hanson, Ph.D., History

Admission is free. Sponsored by Cal Lutheran and the Thousand Oaks Grant R. Brimhall Library. Funded by the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation Grant for “Lyceum: Humanities and Beyond!” For information, contact Cindy Keitel at ckeitel@callutheran.edu.

“The New History of American Slaveries”

Christina Snyder

Thursday, Sept. 27, 7 p.m.

Ullman Conference Center 100/101

American slavery began long before Europeans arrived in the New World. Evidence from archaeology and oral tradition indicates that for hundreds, perhaps thousands, of years, Native Americans had developed their own forms of bondage. This should not be surprising since most societies in history have practiced slavery and kept a high proportion of the total global population unfree, according to archaeologist Catherine Cameron. If slavery is ubiquitous, however, it also takes on many distinct forms.

Christina Snyder, the McCabe Greer Professor of History at Penn State University, studies the intersections of colonialism, race and slavery, with a focus on North America from the pre-contact era through the 19th century. She is the author of “Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America”(Harvard UP, 2010) and “Great Crossings: Indians, Settlers, and Slaves in the Age of Jackson” (Oxford UP, 2017), which won this year’s Francis Parkman Prize from the Society of American Historians.

Admission is free. Sponsored by the History Department, Alpha Xi Psi Chapter of the Phi Alpha Theta History Honor Society, and the Organization of AmericanHistorians. For information, contact Sam Claussen at sclaussen@callutheran.edu.

Faculty Recital

Micah Wright, clarinet

Friday, Sept. 28, 7:30 p.m.

Samuelson Chapel

Micah Wright will be joined by pianist Hui Wu for an evening of clarinet repertoire and transcriptions. Music by Claude Debussy, César Franck, Leonard Bernstein and Sergei Prokofiev.

Donations accepted. For information, call the Music Department at 805-493-3306 or visit CalLutheran.edu/music.

3rd Annual Spectrum of Opportunity Conference

Saturday, Oct. 6, 9 a.m.–3 p.m.

Gilbert Arena

Our third annual conference focuses on preparing students with autism to access higher education and thrive. In presentations and a variety of breakout sessions, college students on the autism spectrum, professionals and educators share information and advice with families and others in supportive roles. Continental breakfast and lunch are included.

$30 for students and self-advocates; $90 for others. Sponsored by the Cal Lutheran Autism and Communication Center. For information, visit CalLutheran.edu/autism.

Faculty Recital

Dana Rouse, mezzo-soprano

Saturday, Oct. 6, 7:30 pm.

Samuelson Chapel

Dana Rouse collaborates with pianist Soon Kim to present a recital of works by Vivaldi, Strauss, Barber and Sondheim. Rouse is a member of Areté Vocal Ensemble and directs the Los Robles Children’s Choir in Westlake Village. She performs in sacred and oratorio performances each year in Ventura County, and this year celebrates 25 years of teaching.

Donations accepted. For information, call the Music Department at 805-493-3306 or visit CalLutheran.edu/music.

Fake News, Real Blues:

How Changing Technologies and a Lack of Diversity in Newsrooms are Hurting Media Coverage of Latinos and People of Color

Russell Contreras

Monday, Oct. 8, 7 p.m.

Lundring Events Center

Russell Contreras is a reporter with the Associated Press in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and is a member of the AP’s national race and ethnicity team. He covers immigration, politics in the American Southwest, poverty, travel and Latino issues. Contreras is the former president of UNITY: Journalists for Diversity and a member of the Native American Journalists Association. He has covered stories in Houston, Boston, New York, Los Angeles, Paris, Appalachia, the Mississippi Delta and the U.S.-Mexico Border. He is writing a book on President John F. Kennedy and Latinos.

Admission is free. Sponsored by the Sarah W. Heath Center for Equality and Justice, Lambda Pi Eta and Multicultural Programs. For information, call 805-493-3694 or email CEJ@callutheran.edu.

Founders Day Convocation

Friday, Oct. 19, 10:30–11:30 a.m.

Samuelson Chapel

This annual gathering celebrates the university’s founding. Under the theme of “Rooted and Reaching: Our Calling for the Common Good,” this year’s event highlights the commitment of the university to equip graduates for service to neighbor so that all may flourish.

The Christus Award is given annually at the convocation to recognize significant individual efforts to strengthen the bridge between the church and the university and other contributions to higher education in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. This year’s honorees, the Rev. Glen and Lauri Egertson, executive directors of Lutheran Retreats, Camps and Conferences, operate two outdoor ministry camps in Southern California and recruit and train young adults to mentor children. Glen Egertson is a 1986 graduate of Cal Lutheran who earned a master’s in divinity from the university’s Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary in 2001.

The convocation speaker will be composer and producer Jimmy Sweeden, who graduated in 2015 with a degree in business administration and a minor in theology and Christian leadership.

The program also includes the formal installation and blessing of university governing bodies and student government.

Admission is free. Founders Day Convocation will be available for live viewing and playback at CalLutheran.edu/live. Sponsored by the Division of Mission and Identity. For information, contact the division at 805-493-3589 orrevmmmd@callutheran.edu.

Facts, Frauds and Fictions: Mapping the Top of the World

Ernst F. Tonsing

Friday, Oct. 19, 4 p.m.

William Rolland Art Center 212

This lecture is offered in conjunction with the “Mapping Meaning: Adventures in Cartography” exhibit in the William Rolland Gallery of Fine Art. Professor emeritus Ernst F. Tonsing taught religion, Greek and religious art at Cal Lutheran from 1974 until his retirement in 2003. He has lectured widely on the Dead Sea Scrolls, early Christian art and Martin Luther. A prolific writer on topics ranging from architecture to religion, he is the author of books on the history of Cal Lutheran and of nearby Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, where he is a longtime member. Tonsing has traveled extensively and led Cal Lutheran study tours of Greece and the Middle East. This lecture on his map collection will be presented during homecoming weekend.

Admission is free. Sponsored by the William Rolland Gallery of Fine Art. For information, contact Rachel T. Schmid at 805-493-3697.

Founders Day Concert

University String Symphony & University Wind Ensemble

Friday, Oct. 19, 7:30 p.m.

Samuelson Chapel

The University String Symphony and University Wind Ensemble celebrate homecoming with the annual Founders Day Concert. The string symphony, under the direction of Yoshika Masuda, will perform masterworks from the orchestral repertoire. The wind ensemble, under the direction of Michael Hart, will perform an eclectic mix of traditional favorites and exciting works by contemporary composers.

Donations accepted. For information, call the Music Department at 805-493-3306 or visit CalLutheran.edu/music.

Pyrometric: Earth and Ash in the Anthropocene

Friday, Oct. 19, through Thursday, Jan. 10

Kwan Fong Gallery of Art and Culture

“Pyrometric” investigates fire and wildfires through the lenses of art and ecology, highlighting human contributions to recurring natural processes that are at once destructive and transformative. The exhibit includes ceramics such as hand-thrown fire cones placed in a controlled burn with the aid of Ventura County Firefighters. Artists Amiko Matsuo and Brad Monsma work with locally sourced clay and chaparral and used contemporary and ancient techniques, including a Japanese coil-building method, nejitate. Other materials include the orange fire retardant dropped from helicopters, native seeds, pinecones and ash.

“In Japan, the transitional landscapes between villages, agriculture and mountain forests are called satoyama, where biodiversity and environmental stewardship depend upon human practices and traditions,” says Matsuo. “We see parallels in Southern California, where mixed-use agricultural landscapes suggest ways to connect traditional and new environmental practices.”

Matsuo teaches arts and ceramics at Allan Hancock College. She received her bachelor’s degree in art from UCLA and her master’s in fine art from Kansas State University. Her work has been shown extensively throughout the United States. Monsma is a professor of English at CSU Channel Islands. He received his master’s and doctorate in English and American literature at USC. His writings and poems have appeared in numerous anthologies, and his book, “The Sespe Wild: Southern California’s Last Free River,” was published by the University of Nevada Press. Matsuo and Monsma also collaborated on the translation of “Art Place Japan: The Echigo-Tsumari Art Triennale and the Vision to Reconnect Art and Nature.”

The artists will give a related lecture at 4 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 1, in Richter Hall.

Admission is free. The Kwan Fong Gallery, located in Soiland Humanities Center, is open to the public 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday. For more information, contact curator Rachel T. Schmid at 805-493-3697 or visit CalLutheran.edu/kwanfong.

15th Annual Student Research Symposium

Saturday, Oct. 20

Oral Presentations: 9-10:30 a.m. | Lundring Events Center

Poster Presentations: 10:30 a.m.–noon | Soiland Recreation Center

Cal Lutheran celebrates the scholarly work of top undergraduates at this annual event. Students’ original findings, the product of full-time research under faculty mentors, are often presented at professional conferences and accepted for publication in peer-reviewed journals.

Funding for more than 70 students has been provided by the Swenson Science Summer Research Fellowships, John Stauffer Research Fellowships in the Chemical Sciences, Overton Summer Research Program in Economic, and Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships. Students were also funded by U.S. Department of Education grant programs including Project Acabado’s Aperture Fellowships, ALLIES in STEM fellowships and the Ronald E. McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Program.

Admission is free. Sponsored by the Office of Undergraduate Research

and Creative Scholarship, ALLIES in STEM and the McNair program. For information, call 805-493-3796, email OURCS@callutheran.edu or visit CalLutheran.edu/OURCS.

Homecoming Concert

Cal Lutheran Choral Ensembles

Sunday, Oct. 21, 2 p.m.

Samuelson Chapel

The Cal Lutheran Choir and the Women’s Chorale open the season with one of their hallmark concerts, featuring an eclectic program of exciting and innovative choral music. Wyant Morton conducts.

Donations accepted. For more information, call the Music Department at 805-493-3306 or visit CalLutheran.edu/music.

Mathews Leadership Forum

Wednesday, Oct. 24, 5:45 p.m.

Lundring Events Center

Each year, the Mathews Leadership Forum provides an opportunity for the campus community to engage in meaningful dialogue on an important topic with business and community leaders.

Started as a classroom seminar in 1970 by former Cal Lutheran President Mark Mathews, the forum builds relationships between students and employers and provides mentoring opportunities. This year, students will be matched with community leaders and university faculty and staff for roundtable discussions on the theme of “Finding Your Path to Success.”

After dinner, a panel discussion features three Cal Lutheran alumni: Emily Barany, founder and owner of Visonality; Tom Holt, president and CEO of Urbane Café; and Marisol Rodriguez, fire captain with Ventura County Fire Department. Mike Panesis, executive director of the CLU Center for Entrepreneurship, will moderate.

Tickets for business representatives and community members are $55. For reservations, visit CalLutheran.edu/cla. For more information, contact the University Relations office at 805-493-3151.

University Lecture Series

A Thousand and One Years Ago: 1000 CE

Tuesday, Oct. 23, and Wednesday, Nov. 28, 7-8:30 p.m.

Lundring Events Center

In this series of lectures, with three more to come in the spring of 2019, Cal Lutheran professors will explore what life was like a millennium ago, that is, in about 1000 CE (or A.D.). What age was it? The Dark Ages? The Islamic Golden Age? The Heian Period? All of these and more? Come find out!

Oct. 23: “Devotion to God: Monks, Saints, Relics, and Pilgrimage” – Steven Shisley, Ph.D., Religion

Nov. 28: “The Turkish Expansion in the Islamic World: Ghazis, Sufis, and Mamluks” – Paul Hanson, Ph.D., History

Admission is free. Sponsored by Cal Lutheran and the Thousand Oaks Grant R. Brimhall Library. Funded by the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation Grant for “Lyceum: Humanities and Beyond!” For information, contact Cindy Keitel atckeitel@callutheran.edu.

Women in Music – Inspire & Empower

Wednesday, Oct. 24, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

Preus-Brandt Forum

A panel of prominent women in the music industry will discuss their diverse careers and their views on the changing face of the music industry. Mary Kay Altizer is the performing arts chair of Oaks Christian School. Eve Nelson is a composer, producer and Emmy-winning songwriter whose songs have been used on many series including “Code Black,” “Modern Family” and “”The Mindy Project.” Jennifer Pyken of Westlake Village is an award-winning music supervisor who has worked on shows including “This is Us,” “Knight Rider” and Lost.” Melanie Taylor is a solo recording artist and has toured with John Mayer, Aerosmith and Barry Manilow. Emily Weber is the vice president of creative licensing for Position Music. Moderator Dawn Soler of Thousand Oaks is the senior vice president of music for ABC Television. The event is designed to inspire young women with a passion for music to explore a variety of careers in the industry. A reception will follow. The event is free, but RSVPs are required. To RSVP or for more information, contact Peter Gordon at pgordon@callutheran.edu or 805-493-3305.

Dia de los Muertos

Thursday, Oct. 25, 5-7:30 p.m.

Ullman Commons back patio

Join the Cal Lutheran community and the Latin American Student Organization in honoring the lives of our deceased loved ones for Día de los Muertos, a holiday celebrated throughout Mexico and Central and South America. The evening will include family-friendly activities such as arts and crafts and face painting, raffles, wonderful desserts and music. A traditional altar will be displayed and community members are invited to bring pictures of their loved ones to include.

Admission is free. The ground-level patio is located past the breezeway of Ullman Commons in front of the Mail Center. Sponsored by the Latin American Student Organization and Multicultural Programs. For more information, contact Leslie Madrigal at lmadrigal@callutheran.edu or Carlos Gonzalez at cgonzalez@callutheran.edu.

Meet the Author

Florencia Ramirez

“Eat Less Water”

Thursday, Oct. 25, 7 p.m.

Ullman Conference Center 100/101

By 2030, two-thirds of people living on this planet may not have enough water, a situation that could result in the deaths of millions and an unprecedented rise in military conflicts. Can we as individuals hope to reverse these dire predictions? An award-winning author and water activist, Florencia Ramirez, believes we can if our conservation efforts focus on the 70 percent of fresh water flowing to the fields and ranches that grow our food. “Eat Less Water” takes the reader on a journey to meet America’s food producers growing food with less water. Ramirez exposes the seldom-seen connection between dwindling water resources and the choices we make when shopping for groceries, and offers a solution that begins in the kitchen.

Admission is free. Sponsored by Cal Lutheran’s Sarah W. Heath Center for Equality and Justice, Pearson Library and SEEd Garden. For information, call 805-493-3694 or email CEJ@callutheran.edu.

“She Kills Monsters”

By Qui Nguyen

Thursday to Saturday, Oct. 25-27, 8 p.m.; Sunday, Oct. 28, 2 p.m.

Black Box Theatre

“She Kills Monsters” is an exciting and nostalgic romp through the ultimate game of Dungeons & Dragons. This equally tender and hilarious story follows Agnes as she finds a D&D module in her late younger sister’s room and decides to embark on an adventure where monsters come in many forms, good companions always have your back, and even grief can be conquered. Imaginatively directed, designed and acted by students, the production will draw the audience into the world of the game, providing fun and laughs for nerds and non-nerds alike.

The play contains adult subject matter and language.

Admission is free with limited seating. Presented by the Theatre Arts Department. For more information, call 805-493-3452 or visit CalLutheran.edu/theater.

Franzen Organ Recital Series

Janette Fishell

Saturday, Oct. 27, 7:30 p.m.

Samuelson Chapel

Janette Fishell, professor and chair of the organ department at the Jacobs School of Music at Indiana University, will perform the first concert of the 2018-2019 Orvil and Gloria Franzen Organ Recital Series. A recitalist with a wide repertoire and interest in music of all periods, Fishell has an especially keen interest in J.S. Bach and Petr Eben, both of whose organ works she has performed in their entirety. She regularly performs in concert venues throughout the United States, Europe and Asia.

Admission is free. For more information, call Campus Ministry at 805-493-3228 or visit CalLutheran.edu/music.