Santa Barbara Zoo Announces Asian Elephant "Little Mac" Is in Hospice Care

UPDATE 9/26:

Little Mac, the Santa Barbara Zoo’s 48-year-old Asian elephant, was humanely euthanized last night (Wednesday, September 25) at approximately 7 p.m. She was in her exhibit yard, surrounded by her keepers and other Zoo staff who have cared for her over the years. Her body was removed by crane to a truck and taken to the California Animal Health & Food Safety Laboratory in San Bernardino, which is run by U.C. Davis, where a necropsy will be initiated today (Thursday, September 26). The results will take several weeks to be developed and will contribute to ongoing research into the health and welfare of elephants under human care.

This followed several days of what Zoo officials called hospice care for the elderly elephant who arrived at the Zoo from India in 1972 with her companion Sujatha (pronounced sue-JAW-tha), who died in October 2018.

This decision was made due to her declining condition as a result of her ongoing medical issues, some of which were common in geriatric elephants and some new medical problems that had developed since June.

“She faced chronic challenges with her teeth and arthritis in her legs, but her overall condition began declining in June due to the onset of additional medical problems. She continued to decline in spite of our best efforts, especially in the past two weeks,” said Dr. Julie Barnes, the Zoo’s vice president of animal care and health. “We had exhausted the medical options available that would allow her to have a good quality of life. It was time to let her go.”

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SANTA BARBARA ZOO’S ASIAN ELEPHANT LITTLE MAC NOW RECEIVING HOSPICE CARE

Zoo and VNA Health Provide Staff and Guests with Grief Guidance

Little Mac, the Santa Barbara Zoo’s 48-year-old Asian elephant, now receives what zoo officials call hospice care following a sharp decline in her physical condition over the past two weeks.

She has suffered from intermittent gastrointestinal issues since a bout of colic in mid-June, and has lost weight. She has exhibited lowered activity levels, less engagement with training, and a loss of appetite. Last week, tests detected blood in Little Mac’s boli (dung), which she is being treated for. She also receives treatments for several ongoing medical conditions common in geriatric elephants, such as chronic arthritis.

After exhausting treatment options, she is being kept comfortable for as long as possible. Little Mac’s hospice care includes treating her symptoms, providing her with drugs to increase her comfort, and engaging her with her usual training, if she chooses.

“Just as with a beloved family member, we needed to take time to explore all options and make the best possible decision,” said Zoo President/CEO Rich Block. “This is certainly not the outcome we had hoped for or have worked toward. It is time to start considering euthanasia as a compassionate and respectful option for her. We’ve gone public about this to allow all of us to begin to cope with her passing.”

The Zoo has asked VNA Health (formerly Visiting Nurse & Hospice Care) to provide guidance for Zoo staff and guests in dealing with anticipatory grief, similar to that experienced by families with a loved one in hospice care. This includes a session with Zoo staff and a blog posting on the Zoo’s website about bereavement (www.sbzoo.org/loss) of loved ones and even pets and Zoo animals.

Donations in Little Mac’s memory can be made to the International Elephant Foundation at www.elephantconservation.org or to the Zoo’s Toys4Animals Amazon Wish List. Gifts of organic, pesticide-free tree trimmings and branches are also welcome (www.sbzoo.org/support/browse).

Little Mac at the Santa Barbara Zoo (Photo Credit: Rashun Drayton).

Little Mac at the Santa Barbara Zoo (Photo Credit: Rashun Drayton).

Little Mac’s Recent History

Little Mac has lived at the Santa Barbara Zoo since 1972. She has been the Zoo’s sole Asian elephant following the death of her companion, a 47-year-old Asian elephant named Sujatha (pronounced sue-JAW-tha), on October 16, 2018.

An Asian elephant is considered geriatric around age 40. At 48, Little Mac has exceeded the median life expectancy for Asian elephants in human care, which is 46.9 years. That means that half the animals live less than 46.9 years, and half live longer.

A behavioral study was recently conducted to help determine Little Mac’s future. Her options included to remain at her Zoo home of 46 years with keepers and an environment she knew, or to be moved to a different facility or sanctuary to be introduced to other Asian elephants.

“Little Mac initially was doing very well and showing good behavioral indicators of coping well with being on her own,” says Dr. Julie Barnes, the Zoo’s director of animal care and health. “Unfortunately, we have been grappling with increasing medical problems that affect her health, behavior, and overall well-being. We held out hope that she would bounce back, but her ‘bad days’ now greatly outnumber her ‘good days.’”

Early last week, keepers noticed a change in the color of Little Mac’s boli (dung). Tests suggest that there is bleeding in her intestines, which she is being treated for. Other zoo veterinarians experienced in geriatric elephant care and equine specialists have been consulted, but no diagnosis has been determined.

Elephants at the Santa Barbara Zoo

Little Mac arrived at the Zoo in 1972 at the age of 1½ years with her companion Sujatha and the Zoo’s elephant exhibit was especially designed for the two female elephants. It has been modified many times since 2004 to address the challenges of the elephants’ advanced ages. The two lived together at the Zoo virtually their entire lives. Neither of the two ever bred or produced offspring.

In the nearly 50 years since Little Mac and Sujatha arrived at the Santa Barbara Zoo, standards for elephant management were developed and have been adapted by the AZA. The current needs of the AZA elephant program focus on having bigger herds with breeding bulls, and larger exhibits.

Since that new focus was adopted, the Zoo was “grandfathered in” by AZA for the two elephants and their exhibit. But the Zoo doesn’t have space to expand the elephant exhibit to meet AZA’s current requirements, or to hold a bull elephant.

“We are looking ahead at a time of change. Nothing has been decided, but new animals will be coming to the Zoo,” adds Block. “We will keep the public informed as this process takes shape.”


The Santa Barbara Zoo is located on 30 acres of botanic gardens and is home to nearly 500 individual animals in open, naturalistic habitats. It is accredited by the Association of Zoos & Aquariums (AZA), representing the highest level of animal care, and participates in AZA endangered species programs for California condor, Channel Island fox, and Western lowland gorilla, among others. A private 501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation, the Santa Barbara Zoo depends on community support, not tax dollars, for operations and improvements. Visit www.sbzoo.org.

Thousand Oaks Farmers' Market to Return to Former Site in East End Parking Lot on March 28th

The Ventura County Certified Farmers’ Market Association has cancelled the relocation of the Thousand Oaks Certified Farmers’ Market to the West Side of The Oaks Shopping Center after fire department officials deemed that the site did not meet the current safety standards for emergencies and traffic control.

Although the grand opening did take place last Thursday on March 21, officials determined after an on-site visit that the new location would not meet safety requirements. “Even though we were looking forward to this new site, we absolutely want the market to be safe and accessible,” stated Karen Schott, Operations Manager for the Ventura County Certified Farmers’ Market Association (VCCFMA). “We thank everyone who supported our “dress rehearsal” and we will continue to operate every Thursday bringing the best of California agriculture while we regroup,” she continued. “The new market hours of 12 noon to 5 p.m. did work out well and we will keep these hours when we move back to our previous location,” added Schott.

According to officials of the VCCFMA and The Oaks Shopping Center, the market will return to its former site and construction will be delayed until a new farmers’ market site can be determined on the mall grounds later in the year. The Thousand Oaks Certified Market is returning to its former site in the East End Parking Lot at Wilbur Road starting on Thursday, March 28, 2019 and will be operating with its new hours of 12 noon to 5 p.m.

For more information, call 805-529-6266, or visit the website at www.vccfarmersmarkets.com.

Thousand Oaks Farmers' Market to Move to New Location at The Oaks Shopping Center March 21st

UPDATE 3/26/19: NEVER MIND! Due to traffic control and safety concerns from fire officials, the market has been moved back to the east parking lot as of 3/28/19 (at least for the time being).

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The Thousand Oaks Farmers’ Market held at the The Oaks Shopping Center will soon have a new location and new market hours. The Thousand Oaks market, operated by the Ventura County Certified Farmers’ Market Association (VCCFMA), will move from its existing site at the east end parking lot on Wilbur Road and Thousand Oaks Boulevard to the West Side Delivery Lane between The Oaks parking structure and the main food court entrance. The move will take place starting on Thursday, March 21 and the new hours will run from 12 noon to 5 p.m.

“We are looking forward to moving into a more convenient location for our customers,” stated Karen Schott, Operations Manager for the VCCFMA. “Shoppers will have access to ample parking within the parking structure and the nearby lower level parking lots, allowing for easier access to the market,” continued Schott. “In addition, we hope to introduce the market to a new audience with the Children’s Area and Food Court immediately adjacent to this new location,” she added.

For more information, call 805-529-6266, or visit www.vccfarmersmarkets.com.

About the Ventura County Certified Farmers’ Market Association

The Ventura County Certified Farmers’ Market Association serves the community of Ventura with two Markets -- Wednesdays at the Pacific View Mall, front west parking lot on Main Street from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., and on Saturdays in Downtown Ventura on the corners of East Santa Clara and Palm Streets from 8:30 a.m. to 12 noon. The Thousand Oaks Farmers’ Market is held Thursdays at The Oaks Shopping Center at the east end parking lot, Wilbur Road and Thousand Oaks Boulevard from 1:30 to 6:00 p.m. Santa Clarita Farmers’ Market is held on Sundays at the College of the Canyons, parking lot 5 on Valencia Boulevard from 8:30 a.m. to 12 noon. The Thousand Oaks Farmers’ Market held at the Oaks Shopping Center will soon have a new location and new market hours. The Thousand Oaks market, operated by the Ventura County Certified Farmers’ Market Association (VCCFMA), will move from its former site at the east end parking lot on Wilbur Road and Thousand Oaks Boulevard to the West Side Delivery Lane between the Oaks Parking Structure and the Main Food Court Entrance. The move will take place starting on Thursday, March 21 and the new hours will run from 12 noon to 5 p.m.

“We are looking forward to moving into a more convenient location for our customers,” stated Karen Schott, Operations Manager for the VCCFMA. “Shoppers will have access to ample parking within the parking structure and the nearby lower level parking lots, allowing for easier access to the market,” continued Schott. “In addition, we hope to introduce the market to a new audience with the Children’s Area and Food Court immediately adjacent to this new location,” she added.

For more information, call 805-529-6266, or visit the website at www.vccfarmersmarkets.com.

About the Ventura County Certified Farmers’ Market Association

The Ventura County Certified Farmers’ Market Association serves the community of Ventura with two Markets -- Wednesdays at the Pacific View Mall, front west parking lot on Main Street from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., and on Saturdays in Downtown Ventura on the corners of East Santa Clara and Palm Streets from 8:30 a.m. to 12 noon. The Thousand Oaks Farmers’ Market is held Thursdays at The Oaks Shopping Center at the east end parking lot, Wilbur Road and Thousand Oaks Boulevard from 1:30 to 6:00 p.m. Santa Clarita Farmers’ Market is held on Sundays at the College of the Canyons, parking lot 5 on Valencia Boulevard from 8:30 a.m. to 12 noon.

Segments of the Backbone Trail Re-Open Today, Four Months After Woolsey Fire

A portion of the Backbone Trail managed by the National Park Service in Malibu reopened today, along with the popular Grotto Trail in the Circle X area.

The majority of the 67-mile Backbone Trail is now open, with the exception of a four-mile stretch from Yerba Buena Road to the Mishe Mokwa Trailhead and a six-mile stretch from the Kanan Trailhead east to the Corral Canyon Trailhead. Large portions of the trail have been closed since the Woolsey Fire destroyed 88% of federal parkland in Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area last November.

Backbone Trail repair work (Photo Courtesy of National Park Service)

Backbone Trail repair work (Photo Courtesy of National Park Service)

“Our small trails crew, assisted on some days by our valuable partners, which include members of the California Conservation Corps, Camp 13 and the Santa Monica Mountains Trails Council, did a phenomenal job in restoring these trails,” said David Szymanski, superintendent of Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area. “An especially rainy season hindered the work and created a variety of additional hazards, but these folks really came through and made it happen.”

Other trails and areas in the park still closed include Solstice Canyon and trails in Zuma/Trancas Canyons.

All official trails in Circle X Ranch, one of the park’s most remote and scenic locations, are now open ,including the Mishe Mokwa Loop, Sandstone Peak Trail, and the Tri Peaks Trail. Cheeseboro/Palo Comado Canyons, Paramount Ranch, Rancho Sierra Vista and the Santa Monica Mountains Visitor Center at King Gillette Ranch are also open.

Click here to see photos of the extensive post-fire work (including some before and after photos) that was done to mitigate safety issues caused by “hazard trees” (trees that were badly burned in the fire and are susceptible to falling), eroded trails and warped, burned culverts. Tasks included clearing trails of hazardous rocks, branches and sticks and reestablishing trail pads by spreading any slough that fell from the hillsides onto a trail and finding large rocks and dirt to fill deep ruts that cut directly across trails.

Although these areas are open, there is a closure order for all burned areas that restricts the public to the trails only. Visitors are being asked to stay on trails and be aware that numerous safety hazards still exist. Hikers going off trail can cause more damage to newly restored trails, trample new plants, and prevent the re-growth of fragile vegetation.

The NPS trail crew collaborated on multiple sections of the Backbone Trail with local members of the California Conservation Corps and Camp 13, the only all-female, Malibu-based fire camp in Los Angeles that occasionally assists with trail work. The Santa Monica Mountains Trails Council also helped repair a portion of the Backbone Trail section along Kanan Road in Zuma Canyon.

Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area boasts a network of approximately 500 miles of trails.

Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (SMMNRA) is the largest urban national park in the country, encompassing more than 150,000 acres of mountains and coastline in Ventura and Los Angeles counties. A unit of the National Park Service, it comprises a seamless network of local, state and federal parks interwoven with private lands and communities. As one of only five Mediterranean ecosystems in the world, SMMNRA preserves the rich biological diversity of more than 450 animal species and 26 distinct plant communities. For more information, visit www.nps.gov/samo.

Cal Lutheran University in Thousand Oaks to Add Film and TV Major in the Fall of 2019

California Lutheran University is launching a film and TV major in fall in response to strong student interest in related classes, activities and careers.

Program developer David Grannis, center, working with students   (Photo credit: Brian Stethem )

Program developer David Grannis, center, working with students (Photo credit: Brian Stethem )

The university has provided communication majors with the option of pursuing an emphasis in film and TV for more than a decade, and the classes are consistently full with long waitlists. Each year, many students produce films for a screening festival and a 48-hour competition on campus and participate in the university’s TV and Cinema Production Club and Digital Cinema Guild.

The new program will more fully prepare students for the field with the addition of classes in advanced television production, post-production and distribution, and introduction to film studies. Film and TV majors will also take research methods and capstone classes and complete internships or independent studies. Film and TV majors will organize the Cal Lutheran Annual Film Festival, now in its 24th year.

“I’m excited to be able to offer this new major at a time when the industry is creating so many new opportunities with companies like Netflix and Amazon,”said David Grannis, an associate professor of communication who first proposed the major 20 years ago. “It will provide students the opportunity to learn from faculty who have worked in the industry and train in Cal Lutheran’s on-campus television studio and on locations using equipment with the same high-quality production value as those used by industry professionals.”

Students will have the option of pursuing an emphasis in film studies or production. A minor in film and TV will also be offered.

The program is interdisciplinary, incorporating classes already offered by the communication, English, languages and cultures, music, multimedia, political science, and theater arts and dance departments.

Strong interest and the campus’ proximity to Hollywood have led many students to go into the field even without a dedicated major. Cal Lutheran has developed internships with ABC, CBS, Disney, Fox Sports, KTLA and other companies based in Hollywood. Alumni have gone on to work as camera operators, cinematographers, directors, editors, executives, managers, producers and writers for companies including Bunim-Murray Productions, ESPN, Netflix, the NFL and Participant Media.

Several films produced for the campus’ annual festival have won awards at other festivals. A Cal Lutheran team’s production was nominated for the “Best of” award during the Los Angeles 48-Hour Film Holiday Project 2017. Grannis and two of his students produced a documentary on California’s historic drought that was screened at a sustainability conference in Maryland and during last year’s Arbor/Earth Month celebration in Thousand Oaks.

Free Dignified American Flag Disposal Offered to the Public at Pierce Brothers Valley Oaks

Pierce Brothers Valley Oaks – Griffin Memorial Park, Mortuary and Crematory has announced that it will provide free dignified U.S. flag disposal year-round to the community. Community members are encouraged to bring tattered and worn flags to the office at 5600 Lindero Canyon Road in Westlake Village. The flags will be transported to the Pierce Brothers Valley Oaks Crematory and destroyed in an appropriate manner.

“The United States flag is a revered symbol of freedom and justice and should be treated with the highest respect,” said Tamara Eacker, general manager. “This extends to its eventual retirement and destruction, which is why we are offering this free service to our community.”

No other symbol captures the power and glory of our nation. It has flown as our national emblem in some form without interruption since 1777. The American flag remains a living piece of history and a source of pride and unity for all Americans. It embodies the very qualities that make our nation great: liberty, justice, freedom, love of country and national purpose.

The United States Flag Code formalizes and unifies the traditional ways in which Americans give respect to the flag. It states that, “The flag, when it is no longer a fitting emblem of display, should be destroyed in a dignified way, preferably by burning.” The code also provides information on the use and display of the flag. Visit this link to read the complete U.S. Flag Code.

For more information, contact Pierce Brothers Valley Oaks at (818) 889-0902.

About Pierce Brothers Valley Oaks

Pierce Brothers Valley Oaks Memorial Park, Mortuary and Crematory, FD 1344, in Westlake Village, Calif., is a proud Dignity Memorial provider. The Dignity Memorial network of more than 1,800 funeral, cremation and cemetery service providers is North America’s most trusted resource for funeral and memorialization services. Dignity Memorial providers offer an unmatched combination of products and locations serving families with care, integrity, respect and service excellence. For more information, call (818) 889-0902 or visit www.piercebrothersvalleyoaks.com.

Elderly Female Snow Leopard Zoe Passes Away at the Santa Barbara Zoo

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An elderly snow leopard named Zoe passed away on Thursday, February 14, 2019, at the Santa Barbara Zoo. Though she was advanced in age and being treated for related ailments, her death was sudden and unexpected. A keeper in the vicinity alerted the Zoo’s veterinary team, which attempted to resuscitate the 15-year-old big cat, but were unsuccessful.

“Zoe was being treated for osteoarthritis of her hind legs, early renal failure, and hypertension, which are common in geriatric large cats,” said Dr. Julie Barnes, the Zoo’s director of animal care and health. “Given the suddenness of her death, I suspect a heart attack or a stroke.”

A necropsy was performed Friday, February 15, but revealed no specific findings to explain Zoe’s sudden death. Tissues have been submitted to a lab for analysis, which may provide more information, but the results will not be available for two to four weeks.

Zoe’s body has been sent to Midwestern University in Arizona as part of a vascular anatomy study in snow leopards, which is supported by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums’ (AZA) Species Survival plan for snow leopards. The species is highly endangered it its home range of Central Asia.

“This study will contribute to the knowledge of snow leopard anatomy which has not been documented in detail,” adds Dr. Barnes.

About Zoe and Snow Leopards at the Zoo

Zoe was born on May 18, 2003 at the Akron Zoo in Ohio. She arrived at the Santa Barbara Zoo in 2010. Everett is six years older and arrived at the Zoo in 2011 from the Lincoln Park Zoo in Chicago, Illinois.

Though Everett has a genetic disorder that made him sterile, he showed an unusual amount of interest in Zoe when she first arrived. Keepers did careful introductions, and the two became contented companions.

“In the wild, adult snow leopards are solitary unless it is mating season or a female is raising young. So it was a rare treat for our guests to witness the two snow leopards not only get along, but actually romp and snuggle together,” says Dr. Barnes.

Dr. Barnes notes that animals under human care are living longer due to the high quality of geriatric care now available. Gingerbread, an African lion, lived at the Santa Barbara Zoo for 13 of her 18 years before passing away in February 2017. Her lifelong mate Chadwick, now aged 20, currently receives special care related to age and poor vision. Zoo staff has decided to have him live out the rest of his life at the Zoo without the stress of introducing new lions.

At age 21 years and seven months, Everett is currently the oldest snow leopard in any accredited AZA zoo.

“Given his age and current geriatric medical conditions, it is not in Everett’s best interest to be moved,” says Dr. Barnes. “As with Chadwick, we will continue to care for him for the rest of his life.”

Snow Leopards are Critically Endangered

Snow leopards are critically endangered and currently number between an estimated 3,900 and 6,400 in the mountains of Central Asia. They have long been prized as hunter’s trophies, destroyed as predators of domestic flocks, and sought as a source of valuable fur.

Adapted for the extreme weather, snow leopards have been viewed at elevations as high as 19,600 feet in summer. Their furry feet help them to stay on top of the snow by providing a greater surface area – like snow shoes – and their fur keeps their paws warm and dry, providing traction as well. Unlike most big cats, snow leopards don’t roar, but they do make vocalizations.

About the Santa Barbara Zoo

Known as one of the world’s most beautiful zoos, the Santa Barbara Zoo is located on 30 acres of botanic gardens and is home to nearly 500 individual animals in open, naturalistic habitats. It is accredited by the Association of Zoos & Aquariums (AZA), representing the highest level of animal care, and participates in AZA endangered species programs for Asian elephant, California condor, island fox, and Western lowland gorilla, among others. A private 501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation, the Santa Barbara Zoo depends on community support, not tax dollars, for operations and improvements.

It is open daily from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.; general admission $18 for adults, $13 for seniors aged 65+, $11 for children aged 2-12, and free for children under 2. Parking is $11. Visit www.sbzoo.org.

VCCF Update on Conejo Valley Victims Fund, Fires and Scholarships

Some updates from the Ventura County Community Foundation (VCCF):

A good place to start for those seeking aid in recovery from local disasters is Ventura County 2-2-1. Visit THIS LINK for an intake form to start the process (THiS LINK for Spanish).

Note that VCCF continues to raise support for those impacted by the Thomas Fire as well. For those individuals in need of financial assistance in relationship to the Thomas Fire who are not currently working with a case manager, they should reach out to 2-1-1 so they can be assigned to the appropriate organization.

Conejo Valley Victims Fund

The final protocol for financial support for those impacted by the Borderline Bar & Grill shooting has been finalized at THIS LINK.

The deadline for submitting a claim is February 18, 2019. For more information, visit www.ConejoValleyVictimsFund.org.

Hill Fire/Woolsey Fire Sudden and Urgent Needs Effort Update

The VCCF has granted more than $1,125,321 since the start of the Hill and Woolsey fires, including:

  • $150,000 to the Pacific Coast and Ventura County Chapter of the American Red Cross (Red Cross) for an Emergency Response Vehicle

  • $115,000 to the Red Cross for Ventura County Recovery Coordination

  • $146,250 to the Red Cross for General Operations Support

  • $1,394 to Ride On Therapeutic Horsemanship for Evacuation expenses for horses, additional staffing, fuel for trailers, stall cleaning   

  • $10,000 to Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Conejo Valley for expenses related to serving children during school closures, club clean-up, and counseling services              

  • $30,000 total to KCLU Public Radio (California Lutheran University) with $20,000 to replace damaged main transmitter and supporting equipment and an additional $10,000 for matching funds for the campaign to replace equipment, which they met.

  • $5,000 to 805 Help to support their immediate response to bring online access to our community during the fires

  • $15,000 to Senior Concerns for adult daycare, meals and support for our community’s seniors who were evacuated and need care

  • $5,350 to Livingston Memorial Visiting Nurse Association to help cover costs associated with evacuations of those on hospice

  • $7,000 to the Camarillo Boys & Girls Club to cover costs associated with emergency childcare needs due to school closures

  • $9,500 to the Southeast Ventura YMCA to cover costs associated with emergency childcare needs due to school closures

  • $1,827 to Mark Watring Stables for the evacuation of 43 horses, hauling of feed and water supplies, and overtime

  • $25,000 to the Economic Development Collaborative for General Operations Support as they serve business owners impacted by the fires

  • $21,500 to Cal State Channel Islands Foundation to feed and house students evacuated by the fires

  • $500 to Cal Lutheran University’s Center for Nonprofit Leadership to sponsor a free webinar entitled “Fundraising in Response to a Community Crisis”

  • $445,000 to the Southeast Ventura County YMCA to provide individual assistance to families affected by the fires.

  • $6,000 to the Boys & Girls Club of Greater Oxnard & Port Hueneme to help cover expenses related to serving children during school closures.

  • $5,000 to Fly-Hope Dream to cover flights for fire survivors.

  • $10,000 to Little Angels Project to cover costs of veterinary care for injured animals.

  • $16,000 to Lockwood Animal Rescue Center to provide lodging and basic needs for people and animals.

  • $100,000 to Salvation Army for case management and basic needs assistance.

Nonprofit organizations responding to the needs from the fires should complete and submit their brief application at www.vccf.org.  Organizations can submit more than one time as needs arise. 

VCCF Scholarship Program

The VCCF Annual Scholarship Program is still accepting applications for local students pursuing their career and educational goals. Over $1 million in assistance is available in 2019.  The application deadline is January 30th.  Apply at www.vccf.org