Bike Path in Oxnard at Oxnard Beach Park to Channel Islands Harbor

There's a bike path that starts at the ocean side of Oxnard Beach Park at Mandalay Beach Road at Beach Way and takes you south all the way to Hollywood Beach and Channel Islands Harbor. Alternative you can just park at the Oxnard Beach Park and go from there.

Cross Harbor Boulevard and make your way into Channel Islands Harbor, where you can ride all the way to the south end of the harbor.

Entrance to bike path at Mandalay Beach Road and Beach Way

Entrance to bike path at Mandalay Beach Road and Beach Way

There's a loop you can do around Oxnard Beach Park

There's a loop you can do around Oxnard Beach Park

The bike path continues south and goes around the Embassy Suites Mandalay Beach Hotel

The bike path continues south and goes around the Embassy Suites Mandalay Beach Hotel

Soon after passing the hotel, the path swing east towards Harbor Boulevard

Soon after passing the hotel, the path swing east towards Harbor Boulevard

At Harbor Boulevard, you can cross over to Channel Islands Harbor or veer right (west) on West Channel Islands Boulevard towards Hollywood Beach. 

At Harbor Boulevard, you can cross over to Channel Islands Harbor or veer right (west) on West Channel Islands Boulevard towards Hollywood Beach. 

plenty of sand at Hollywood Beach. There's a restroom facility here. You can bike along Ocean Drive, which parallels the beach, to an entry point. do note that you are no longer on a bike path. you can continue south on Ocean Drive until its endpoint, where you turn left on South Harbor Boulevard past Channel View Park, where you will soon reach Channel Islands Harbor. 

plenty of sand at Hollywood Beach. There's a restroom facility here. You can bike along Ocean Drive, which parallels the beach, to an entry point. do note that you are no longer on a bike path. you can continue south on Ocean Drive until its endpoint, where you turn left on South Harbor Boulevard past Channel View Park, where you will soon reach Channel Islands Harbor. 

On S. Harbor Boulevard going north now, you will be able to take a right (east) turn on Albacore Way to get to the nice pedestrian/bike path along Channel Islands Harbor. It will take you past the channel islands Maritime Museum and marina, where there are restaurants and other things to do.

On S. Harbor Boulevard going north now, you will be able to take a right (east) turn on Albacore Way to get to the nice pedestrian/bike path along Channel Islands Harbor. It will take you past the channel islands Maritime Museum and marina, where there are restaurants and other things to do.

Pretty cool place to ride bikes at the harbor...and rarely crowded in my experience.

Pretty cool place to ride bikes at the harbor...and rarely crowded in my experience.

If you and the kids are up to it and want a longer ride, after reaching the north side of the Harbor, you can take Harbor Boulevard back over to W. Channel Islands Boulevard over the bridge to the middle of the Harbor. There's a popular Toppers Pizza over there. Or go the east side of the Harbor. 

If you and the kids are up to it and want a longer ride, after reaching the north side of the Harbor, you can take Harbor Boulevard back over to W. Channel Islands Boulevard over the bridge to the middle of the Harbor. There's a popular Toppers Pizza over there. Or go the east side of the Harbor. 

Other options of course include parking at the Channel Islands Harbor somewhere and cycling your way up to the Oxnard Beach Park. And you can also pedal your way over to S. Victoria Avenue and take the bike lane all the way down to Silverstrand Beach (or even park at Silverstrand and ride your way up from there...though do take not that this is not a bike path). Have fun!

Red Brick Art Gallery and School in Ventura

Red Brick Art is a fine art gallery located at 4601 Telephone Rd #112, Ventura with a strong focus on art classes as well as free events and cultural outreach.

Exhibits change change bi-monthly and feature the work of talented artists who host workshops at the studio. Artists of all mediums are represented including a wide variety of glass art (fused, blown, cracked and mosaic), clay, stone, metal, mixed media, wood, photography and all forms of painting. 

Classes for adults and youth are offered each weekend for beginning and intermediate students. Adult classes include photography, Photoshop, watercolor painting, pastel, acryllic painting and mosaics.

Additionally, painting parties are offered both at the Red Brick Studio (these classes do not include wine) as well as at local tasting rooms "Paint and Sip" events like Four Brix Winery, Sunland Vintage Winery and Aldabella Custom Crush.

Learn more at redbrickart.com.

Pinot's Palette - Westlake Village

Pinot's Palette - Westlake Village is located at 2879 Agoura Road (at Village Glen). It opened in May 2015. Sign up and enjoy an evening of fun, friends and fine art. Pinot's Palette supplies the canvas, paint, brushes and instruction along with a bar stocked with beer and wine for purchase.

Local artists  will guide you step-by-step through a featured painting. At the end of the night...leave with your own masterpiece!

Learn more at www.pinotspalette.com/westlakevillage or call 805.379.9963.

Elite Theatre Company in Oxnard

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The Elite Theatre Company (ETC) has been entertaining, educating and enriching its audience since 1994. After 19 seasons, ETC relocated to the Channel Islands Harbor Fisherman's Wharf at the site of the old Maritime Museum at 2731 S. Victoria Avenue, Oxnard.

ETC brings together the local talents of amateurs and professionals who share a passion for theater and who generously volunteer their time on the stage and behind the scenes. This collaboration creates a variety of quality live theatrical productions showcased in ETC's unique setting.

ETC is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization as well as a proud member of the Four Star Theater Awards Committee and the alliance of Ventura County Theaters.

Learn more at www.elitetheatre.org.

Oak Creek Canyon Loop Trail in Thousand Oaks

The Oak Creek Canyon Loop Trail is a about a mile hike that is great to do with the kids near the Los Robles Trail in Thousand Oaks.

Get there by taking Moorpark Road south of the 101 until it ends at Greenmeadow Avenue. Turn right and drive about half a mile to the parking lot.

signs along the oak creek canyon whole access interpretative trail are in braille

signs along the oak creek canyon whole access interpretative trail are in braille

The first .4 mile section of trail is called the Oak Creek Canyon Whole Access Interpretive Trail and is a mostly shaded oak grove area that is accessible by all, including equestrians, bicycles, hikers, wheelchairs, disabled and blind individuals. In fact, there is actually a "guide cable" along the fence as well as informational signs in braille. Pretty unique feature that offhand I have not seen at any other local trails. 

one of three picnic benches along the interpretive trail

one of three picnic benches along the interpretive trail

There is a restroom, drinking fountain and picnic bench at the trailhead as well as two other picnic tables and a bench on this portion of the trail. There is also abundant poison oak on the sides of the trails, so be careful to stay on the trail.

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At the end of the Interpretive Trail section of the loop, you reach a well maintained dirt trail through the chaparral that is a bit more challenging and ok for most kids. There's a few moderate hills to be aware of, making it somewhat of a challenge with a stroller but in my opinion, a do-able challenge. And of course, you can always turn around and take the Interpretive Trail back. 

The loop trail continues on the left

The loop trail continues on the left

one of the moderate hills on the trail

one of the moderate hills on the trail

You go about .4 mile back towards Greenmeadow. Before you get to the street you will see a bench on the west side of the trail. Do be aware that there is no sidewalk on this section of Greenmeadow as you walk back towards the parking area. More information and a map available on the Conejo Open Space Foundation website at www.cosf.org/website/html/oak-creek-canyon.html.

Brooker Tracker R/C Race Track and Hobby Shop in Moorpark

Brooker Tracker is a Radio Control Carpet Race Track and Hobby Shop for average racers looking for hobby grade performance race vehicles along with the latest hop-up parts and accessories. The shop recently relocated to the Moorpark Community Marketplace, 709 Science Drive, Moorpark. The Marketplace is currently open Friday through Sunday from 10 am to 6 pm. Learn more at www.facebook.com/pages/Brooker-Tracker-Enterprises-LLC/177250911703.

Brooker Tracker R/C

El Rincon, El Cerro and Las Brisas Trails in Dos Vientos Section of Newbury Park

In the heart of Dos Vientos (Spanish for Two Winds), there are three trails that are accessible from multiple spots by walkers, hikers, runners and bikers. These are the El Rincon, El Cerro and Las Brisas trails. These trails are all nicely maintained, single track and provide great views of the surrounding areas. Other trails surrounding Dos Vientos include the Vista Del Mar Trail, Sierra Vista Trail, Sumac Trail (kind of parallels Sierra Vista Trail), El Encanto Trail and Powerline (Edison Road) Trail, as well as the Potrero Ridge Trail.

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Access to the El Rincon Trail is near the corner of Via Rincon and Rancho Dos Vientos. The trail is about 4/10ths of a mile and connects with the El Cerro and Las Brisas trails.

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ElRinconTrail2.JPG

Access to El Cerro and Las Brisas trails is at the juncture of Via Las Brisas and Calle Del Prado and several other points. Visit www.cosf.org/website/html/dos-vientos-map.html for a trail map on the Conejo Open Space Foundation website.

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Old Boney Trail Hike in Pt. Mugu State Park

If you're looking for a hike of about 10 miles in the Rancho Sierra Vista/Boney Mountain Wilderness area, consider the Old Boney Trail loop from Newbury Park. You can park either in the National Park Service parking lot or at Wendy Drive where it meets Potrero Road.

You can do the hike clockwise or counter-clockwise since it is a loop course. I prefer clockwise, which starts by trekking through Rancho Sierra Vista to Danielson Road. Details of this path are at THIS LINK. This path gets you to a juncture where you can continue another 3/10ths of a mile to the Danielson Monument (which you definitely should do if you've never been there) or veer a sharp right up the Old Boney Trail.

Sign at juncture of Danielson Road trail and Old Boney Trail in Pt. Mugu State Park

Sign at juncture of Danielson Road trail and Old Boney Trail in Pt. Mugu State Park

Sign at juncture of Danielson Road trail and Old Boney Trail in Pt. Mugu State ParkI love the Old Boney Trail. It is narrow and covered with growth on both sides. Kind of like running through a chaparral jungle. This makes the trail mostly shade covered for the first couple miles of this 3.5 mile stretch of trail. You'll be treated to some nice views of Boney Mountain along the way.

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Although the Old Boney Trail does not reach a peak for panoramic views, you'll still find several spots that reward you with views towards the Channel Islands and west Ventura County.

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About a mile or mile and a half into Old Boney Trail from Danielson Road, you'll see a turnoff sign to the right that takes you to the Fossil Trail, a mile or so drop back down to the bottom of Sycamore Canyon. The drop is about 1300 ft to 500 ft with plenty of rocky surfaces, so you'll have some fun going back down this way, for a shorter route. And of course, look closely and you'll be treated to surfaces covered with sea fossil imprints from millions of years ago.

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From the Old Boney Trail/Fossil Trail juncture, you have another 2.1 fun miles to the next juncture at Blue Canyon Trail at the bottom of the canyon. You'll get some more neat views of Boney Mountain during this stretch. At the juncture is the following sign on Blue Canyon Trail.

Sign on Blue Canyon Trail at the Old Boney Trail juncture in Pt. Mugu State Park

Sign on Blue Canyon Trail at the Old Boney Trail juncture in Pt. Mugu State Park

Sign on Blue Canyon Trail at the Old Boney Trail juncture in Pt. Mugu State ParkYou will turn right on Blue Canyon Trail, which will take you to the Danielson Multi-Use area and the paved Sycamore Canyon Fire Road. A left-hand turn will get you lots of fun for another day, onward to Chamberlain Trail that gets you up to some might nice peaks, and Serrano Valley.

Sign at entrance to Blue Canyon Trail at the Danielson Multi-Use area (you of course will be looking at the back side of this sign if you're coming from the Old Boney Trail).

Sign at entrance to Blue Canyon Trail at the Danielson Multi-Use area (you of course will be looking at the back side of this sign if you're coming from the Old Boney Trail).

Sign at entrance to Blue Canyon Trail at the Danielson Multi-Use area (you of course will be looking at the back side of this sign if you're coming from the Old Boney Trail).

I've never actually seen anyone using the Danielson Multi-Use area but here's the picnic area in there!

I've never actually seen anyone using the Danielson Multi-Use area but here's the picnic area in there!

I've never actually seen anyone using the Danielson Multi-Use area but here's the picnic area in there!So you run through the Danielson area to the main paved road to the right (turning left of course will take you to PCH in about 4-5 miles). In another 3 miles you'll be back in civilization; these miles include the 800 foot, 3/4 mile ascent into Rancho Sierra Vista, which can be a bit brutal...perhaps my (and maybe your) least favorite section of this course. But once you're up the hill, you're home free! Time for breakfast, lunch, dinner or all of the above!

Sycamore Canyon Fire Road sign at the top of the hill in Rancho Sierra Vista/Satwiwa.

Sycamore Canyon Fire Road sign at the top of the hill in Rancho Sierra Vista/Satwiwa.

Of course, you can easily reverse this course and make your way DOWN Sycamore Canyon Fire Road, turn left onto Blue Canyon Trail, left on Old Boney Trail for 3.5 miles and then left on Danielson Road, back down into the canyon and up towards Satwiwa.

Boney Mountain Trail to Hidden Valley Overlook, Danielson Monument and Waterfall

At Rancho Sierra Vista/Satwiwa in Newbury Park is a nice assortment of trails that reward hikers with beautiful views and peaceful surroundings.  Find your way to the Satwiwa Native American Culture Center and from there walk up Big Sycamore Canyon Road where you'll reach a fork in the road. If you go straight you'll be taking Big Sycamore Canyon road about 6-7 miles down to Sycamore Canyon Campground and Sycamore Cove Beach. The road is paved for about 3 miles until it intersects the Backbone Trail, at which point it is dirt trails to PCH.

Benches at the top of Big Sycamore Canyon Road.

Benches at the top of Big Sycamore Canyon Road.

Views from the benches looking down Big Sycamore Canyon. Photo taken a few months before the Springs Fire of 2013.

Views from the benches looking down Big Sycamore Canyon. Photo taken a few months before the Springs Fire of 2013.

View of Big Sycamore Canyon after the Springs Fire of 2013.  two years later, the landscape is gradually changing back.

View of Big Sycamore Canyon after the Springs Fire of 2013.  two years later, the landscape is gradually changing back.

Getting back to the benches at the top of Sycamore Canyon, looking off to the east you'll find the Boney Mountain Trail sign that takes you towards the Hidden Valley Overlook, Waterfall and Danielson Monument, a .4 mile, 1 mile and 2.2 mile one way hike, respectively.

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Boney Mountain Trail sign in Rancho Sierra Vista post-Springs fire 5/5/13.

Boney Mountain Trail sign in Rancho Sierra Vista post-Springs fire 5/5/13.

Take the trail to the fork in the road. A sharp left takes you directly back to the Satwiwa Center, a "normal" left takes you on a trail towards Wendy Drive and/or back to the Satwiwa Center in a loop, and a right turn takes you up the hill towards the destinations mentioned above.

A short walk up gets you to yet another bench that overlooks Sycamore Canyon from another angle. This is called the Sycamore Canyon Overlook.

This photo of the sycamore canyon overlook was taken before the Springs Fire of 2013.

This photo of the sycamore canyon overlook was taken before the Springs Fire of 2013.

Bench at Sycamore Canyon Overlook on 5/14/13.

Bench at Sycamore Canyon Overlook on 5/14/13.

The rocky trail from there takes you to a fork, where you can either veer left to the Hidden Valley Overlook trail or right to the Danielson Monument and Waterfall, as well as the Old Boney Trail.

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The Hidden Valley Overlook trail is rocky and a bit challenging and gets you some nice views of Dos Vientos off towards Camarillo. It ends with a nice "overlook" of Hidden Valley.

Endpoint of the Hidden Valley Overlook trail gets you, but of course, a peak into Hidden Valley. This photo was taken in April 2014, when it was actually nice and green back there!

Endpoint of the Hidden Valley Overlook trail gets you, but of course, a peak into Hidden Valley. This photo was taken in April 2014, when it was actually nice and green back there!

Off to the right, a jaunt down the hill gets you to a sign that tells you you're getting close the waterfall.

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There's a stream crossing that most of the year is easy to get across as there's not a lot of water in there, although in particularly rainy winters it can get more challenging in the winter/spring.

Mostly mud in the stream crossing that gets you to the Danielson Monument in mid-February 2013, but some years there's more water in there. (More recently, this has been completely dry.)

Mostly mud in the stream crossing that gets you to the Danielson Monument in mid-February 2013, but some years there's more water in there. (More recently, this has been completely dry.)

So after you cross the stream, you're off on a mostly narrow, single-track trail. Watch out for poison oak on the sides of the trails. I usually run up here in shorts, but you're much safer wearing long pants. The next juncture in the trail, you go straight to the waterfall, or veer right up to the Danielson Monument.

We've been to the waterfall when it had a lot of water flowing in it. This year (2013) there's barely a trickle. More recently (2015) it is pretty much completely dry.

We've been to the waterfall when it had a lot of water flowing in it. This year (2013) there's barely a trickle. More recently (2015) it is pretty much completely dry.

So if you take the sharp right hand turn, you're on your way to the Danielson Monument (a tribute to Richard K. Danielson, who lived on land in this area for 32 years with his family, until it was sold to the National Park Service in 1980). Awesome views from several vantage points as you head up the trail. A bit of a climb. Be prepared! Check out other photos of the monument HERE and larger pics HERE.

Danielson Monument

Danielson Monument

About 4/5ths of the way from the bottom of the canyon to the Danielson Monument, you can veer right to the Old Boney Trail, an interesting, mostly single track trail that has great views of Boney and intersects with the Fossil Trail.

Here's the sign at the juncture of the Danielson Road trail and the Old Boney Trail turnoff, about .3 mile away from the Danielson Monument.

Here's the sign at the juncture of the Danielson Road trail and the Old Boney Trail turnoff, about .3 mile away from the Danielson Monument.

Dog Parks In and Around Ventura County

Dog Parks In and Around Ventura County

Here's a compilation of parks in and around Ventura County as well as adjacent areas that have off-leash opportunities for your pooches. The days and times indicated below are subject to change; links to the local recreation and park districts have been provided below.

Thousand Oaks:

Conejo Creek Dog Park at 1300 E. Avenida de las Flores is a 3 1/2 acre dog park with separate sections for large and small (30 lbs or less) dogs. Open daily 7 am to 8:30 pm; closed Thursdays 7-9 am and all day the 3rd Thursda

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Getty Villa in Pacific Palisades

The Getty Villa is located at 17985 Pacific Coast Highway in Pacific Palisades, one mile north of Sunset Boulevard, overlooking the Pacific Ocean. It is about 28 miles from the heart of Thousand Oaks. The most direct path is the 101 south to Old Topanga Canyon Road, though you can also take other arteries like Malibu Canyon and Kanan to PCH.

The Getty Villa is one of two locations of the J. Paul Getty Museum, the other being the spectacular Getty Center in Brentwood.

The Getty Villa houses the J. Paul Getty Museum’s extensive collection of over 44,000 Greek, Roman and Etruscan antiquities dating from 6,500 BC to 400 AD, including the Lansdowne Heracles and the V

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Los Robles Trail System in Thousand Oaks

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The Los Robles Trail winds from Potrero Road, just east of Wendy Drive in Newbury Park, to Foothill Drive near Fairview Road (near Hampshire Road in Westlake Village). A popular access point is at South Moorpark Road and Greenmeadow Avenue in Thousand Oaks.

Along with its many connecting trails (Triunfo Canyon Trail, Rosewood Trail, White Horse Canyon Trail, Los Padres Trail and more), awesome opportunities abound for hikers, bikers and equestrians to enjoy the open space.

If you're looking for an easy, one mile trail hike with the kids, the Oak Creek Canyon Loop is a nice one to do. There is also a unique Interpretive Trail at Oak Creek Canyon Loop that is accessible to handicapped/wheelchairs and blind individuals! Or extend the Oak Creek Canyon Loop to an easy 3 mile hike to the Los Robles Nature Walk. Also, the 1 mile Spring Canyon Trail is an excellent choice for families with young children.

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For some of the most spectacular views of the Conejo Valley, try hiking up to Angel Vista Peak in Newbury Park.

A rugged, single track trail popular with mountain bikers and hikers is the Los Robles Trail West that goes up "Space Mountain" in Thousand Oaks. And Los Robles Trail East is another nice hike accessible from several points.

This nearly 2,000 acre ridgeline trail system with its many neighborhood feeder trails is located at the southern portion of the Conejo Open Space. The Los Robles Trail also traverses several open space areas including Los Padres, Los Vientos, Conejo Ridge. Hope Nature Preserve, Old Conejo, Deer Ridge, Rancho Potrero and Ventu Park.

Additional Los Robles Trail trailhead points west of the Rosewood Trail trailhead to Angel Vista Peak include Felton Street, east of Lynn Rd in Newbury Park (end of cul de sac) and Potrero Road, about 1/4 mile east of S Wendy Drive in Newbury Park (parking lot available).

Views from Angel Vista Peak are iconic.

Views from Angel Vista Peak are iconic.

To the west of Los Robles is Rancho Sierra Vista/Satwiwa and Point Mugu State Park which creates a public backcountry of over 27,000 acres of open space that stretches to the Pacific Ocean at Sycamore Cove. This scenic region is part of the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area and provides panoramic views of Hidden Valley, the Conejo Valley and the Channel Islands.

Los Robles Trail trailhead and parking area on Potrero Road in Newbury Park

Los Robles Trail trailhead and parking area on Potrero Road in Newbury Park

The Los Robles Trail has historical significance. On February 28, 1776, Juan Bautista de Anza and his band of 198 settlers came through the Conejo Valley on their way from Mexico to San Francisco. Though the 101 freeway is the actual route, the National Park Service has designated the Los Robles Trail as the official recreational route so that everyone can enjoy the only national historical trail in the state of California.

Approximately 25 miles of trails provide a contiguous route from Westlake Village to Newbury Park with several shorter loops into narrow canyons and up steep ridges. The adjoining open space areas are managed by the Conejo Open Space Conservation Agency (COSCA), a joint powers authority created by the City of Thousand Oaks and the Conejo Recreation and Park District in 1977.

Unless you are an ant, this Los Robles Trail map is too small to read...click it for a full-size pdf map!

Unless you are an ant, this Los Robles Trail map is too small to read...click it for a full-size pdf map!

For more information about the Los Robles Trail, visit the Conejo Open Space Foundation website at cosf.org/los-robles.

Santa Rosa Loop Hike in Wildwood Park

The Santa Rosa Loop Hike in Wildwood Park in Thousand Oaks is a 6 1/2 mile loop with some moderately challenging uphills and downhills that enables you to take in some beautiful views of the Conejo Valley and Santa Rosa Valley.

Start at the main Wildwood trailhead at the west end of Avenida de Los Arboles. Start your adventure on the main Mesa Trail towards Lizard Rock. You'll soon reach the following sign and make your way up the Santa Rosa Trail

Box Canyon Loop Trail

With some moderate trekking you'll soon have some nice views of Wildwood Park, the Conejo Valley and the Boney Mountain Range off in the distance. 

As your crest the hill, follow the arrows toward the Lower Santa Rosa Trail.

As your crest the hill, follow the arrows toward the Lower Santa Rosa Trail.

Already at this point you're treated to a continuous view of the beautiful Santa Rosa Valley

Already at this point you're treated to a continuous view of the beautiful Santa Rosa Valley

So you're heading east and almost feeling like maybe you're getting lost, but this indeed is the Santa Rosa Trail. Just stay towards the left. It is single track much of the way over here. Then, you'll see the following sign as you get closer to the bottom of the Santa Rosa Valley.

So now you are zig zagging down the Shooting Star Trail, which eventually merges into the Lower Santa Rosa Trail.

Now you're going to turn left (west) on Lower Santa Rosa Trail for some gentle slopes alongside private residences and farms in the Santa Rosa Valley for about a mile or so.

Some old farming equipment on the side of the Lower Santa Rosa Trail

Some old farming equipment on the side of the Lower Santa Rosa Trail

Then soon you come to the end of the trail and there's a sign that tells you to get back into Wildwood Park via the Box Canyon Trail, take the road up ahead 4/10ths of a mile. You're actually in Camarillo now on Rocky High Road.

The trail ends at the juncture of Talal Ct (private) and Rocky High Road.

The trail ends at the juncture of Talal Ct (private) and Rocky High Road.

At the end of the short stretch of road is the trailhead back into Wildwood Park.

And soon you'll see the Box Canyon Trail sign. Veer left (although I think if you go right it loops around to the main trail also).

Box Canyon Trail Sign

It's about a 300 foot climb over less than half a mile up the Box Canyon Trail that gets you back to the main Mesa Trail artery in Wildwood Park. Take your time...you're almost there!

Box Canyon Lizard Rock Sign Wildwood Park

Then you'll see the Lizard Rock / Box Canyon sign that signifies you are back at the Mesa Trail to head about half a mile back to the parking lot. Or turn right to check out the views from Lizard Rock before you go.

To see a map of this hike, visit www.cosf.org/website/html/santa-rosa-loop.html.