"Bright Lights at UBS" Art Exhibit in Westlake Village through October 30th

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The Arts Council of the Conejo Valley presents Bright Lights at UBS, an arts exhibit with paintings by six artists. The show will hang through October 30, 2019 at the UBS Offices located at 3011 Townsgate Road on the 3rd Floor, in Westlake Village. There will be a free Artists’ Reception on Thursday, September 19, 2019 from 5 – 7 pm at UBS. The title of the show, Bright Lights, brings to mind bold and vivid colors with reflection from nature’s light of the sun, the fun and brighter side of life.

Wendy Gordin is known primarily for her figurative oil paintings. Having traveled extensively, Wendy has photographed people from all over the world in their native costumes, and daily lives and then recreates the scenes on canvas. Wendy grew up on the east coast and made the move to California in 1985. Wendy has had the opportunity to study with many talented artists, and has won several awards through the Westlake Village Art Guild shows, including Best of Show and First place in Oil/Acrylic. In 2013 Wendy had a solo show of over 40 paintings at the Good Life Academy in Los Angeles. She was a finalist in the Artistic Excellence Competition in the December issue 2013 of Southwest Art magazine. She is a member of the Westlake Village Art Guild and American Women Artists.

Carmen Lamp discovered her passion for painting when her mother passed away, and she was given her mother’s paints, brushes and canvases. Recently she’s discovered the immediacy of pastels. Her paintings are inspired by personal photographs or the vision of those who commission her to create a painting that contains elements meaningful to them.

Award-winning artist Anette Power, grew up on an island off the Swedish coast, and began her career in the United States in animation. She spent more than a decade fine-tuning her sense of light, color and setting a mood, working as a background painter for studios like Disney, Warner Bros., Cartoon Network and Universal. Anette now dedicates her time to painting in oils both outdoor and in her studio. “I find myself drawn to subject matters with light and color that celebrate life's fleeting moments,” says Anette.

Renowned contemporary artist, Roland Roy, credits drawing as the foundation for his art. A native of Hawaii now living in Newbury Park, Roland’s work expands the boundaries of composition, color and texture, appealing to knowledgeable curators and collectors worldwide.

Eugenie Spirito has been carving in stone for over two decades. She started her career in New York City, where she apprenticed with world-renowned abstract expressionist sculptor Philip Pavia, a friend and contemporary of Willem DeKooning, Jackson Pollock and Franz Kline. After moving to California, she continued her training with the late Nino Russo and with Robert Cunningham at his studio in Culver City. Eugenie has executed commissions for private collectors in New York City, Los Angeles and Europe. Her patrons include, Harry Hamlin and Lisa Rinna, Kenny G, Lyndie Benson, Brett and Miranda Tollman, James and Blanche Blatt, the family of B. Wayne Hughes, and Carl and Roberta Deutsch.

Debbie Martin is a plein air artist who works in oils, and is a member of the Monday Morning Painters group, meeting weekly at ART TREK. Debbie has created commissioned pieces and often paints landmarks such as Bob’s Big Boy and the Malibu Pier.

Curators are Pamela Fong and Kimberly Wright, who is a member of the Arts Council of the Conejo Valley Board of Directors.

In 2011 the Arts Council of the Conejo Valley partnered with UBS, a Swiss investment bank, to provide continuous arts exhibits at the UBS office in Westlake Village. The partnership continues with themed exhibits that include paintings, photographs and sculptures created by local artists. Each exhibit is launched with a reception where food is provided by one of Westlake’s top restaurants. Visitors may view the art in the reception and conference areas any time during business hours.

The Arts Council for the Conejo Valley (ACCV) was established in 1969. During its over four decade span, the ACCV has gone through extensive changes in its programs and services. Established as a regional Federation of Arts organization that was formed to promote the community’s cultural development, the ACCV has evolved into a membership support agency that also delivers and co-sponsors many cultural programs. The “voice of the arts”, the ACCV provides services to its member organizations that include marketing, technical assistance workshops, and lowered rent at the Hillcrest Center for the Arts. The ACCV has a history of successful partnership in the community. It has joined forces and worked toward a common goal with three major partners – the City of Thousand Oaks, the Conejo Recreation and Park District, and the Conejo Valley Unified School District. The ACCV, in collaboration with Art Trek, created the Conejo Cottontail Project to promote public art throughout the community.

UBS is open during business hours and is free to the public. The Artists Reception is also a free event. For information visit www.conejoarts.com.

Kelly "RISK" Graval "For the Greater Good" Solo Exhibition at California Museum of Art Thousand Oaks through September 4th

California Museum of Art Thousand Oaks (CMATO) is hosting a solo exhibit by Kelly “RISK” Graval through Wednesday, September 4, 2019.

Writing under the pseudonym RISK, Graval rose to prominence as the originator of a bright, colorful, west coast graffiti style. He pioneered “hitting up the heavens” and tagging freight trains to spread his name across the country. By the early 90’s, RISK could be seen all over Los Angeles.

Graval’s mixed-media work follows in the rich tradition of Pop Art. Iconography from Buddhism, rock and roll, advertising, and cartoons figure prominently in his work. Working in neon translates his bright palette into light while painting on metal calls back to the many nights spent in the railyards of Los Angeles County. Graval’s work plays with visual and material juxtapositions to both draw in and push back on the viewer. Metal, lights, paint, grit, and shine are the materials of Graval’s practice and the materials of the city that raised him.

CMATO is located at The Oaks shopping mall 2nd floor, midway between Nordstrom and Macy’s. Hours are Thursdays 3-7PM and Fridays-Sundays noon-7PM. Suggested donation for admission is $6.

Visit cmato.org or call 805.405.5240 for more information.

"The Illusionists" Exhibit at Studio Channel Islands March 30 through May 18

Studio Channel Islands Arts Center (SCI) will present a unique exhibition, The Illusionists, March 30 through May 18 in the SCI Blackboard Gallery located at 2222 E. Ventura Blvd., Camarillo. The exhibit is curated by accomplished artist and California Lutheran University art professor Michael Pearce as part of The Representational Art Conference (TRAC) 2019, the premier international event focusing on cutting-edge representational art in the 21st century. The gallery will host an opening reception, 4 to 6 p.m., April 6, with many of the artists in attendance. Admission is free. The exhibit will feature works by F. Scott Hess, Richard Macdonald, Sandy Yagi, Bryan Larson, Mark Gleason, Conor Walton, Pamela Wilson, Regina Jacobson, Guy Kinnear, Boris Vallejo, Julie Bell, Roger Dean, Vince Natale and others. Gallery hours are Tues.–Fri., 11 a.m.–5 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.–3 p.m. For more information, visit www.studiochannelislands.org, or call 805-383-1368.

"Sanctuaries" Art Exhibit at CSU Channel Islands February 19 to April 7

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Ojai artist Lorraine Serena explores the peace and power of nature in CSUCI exhibition

An artistic exploration of Mother Nature untouched was nearly consumed by Mother Nature unleashed when the Thomas fire threatened the works of Ojai artist Lorraine Serena.

Serena, whose work will appear in an upcoming exhibition at CSU Channel Islands (CSUCI), was evacuated from her Ojai home four times as she and CSUCI Art Lecturer Anette Kubitza put together the show.  The studio where Serena works as well as her art pieces were at her home.

“Each time Lorraine was evacuated, we didn’t know if the work would survive,” Kubitza said.

Titled “Sanctuaries,” the exhibition will run from Feb. 19 to April 7 with a Feb. 22 opening in the John Spoor Broome Gallery. The reception will last from 5 to 7 p.m. with a talk from Serena about her work. Visit the John Spoor Broome Library for library hours.

“For me, ‘Sanctuaries’ is about places of peace and solitude and comfort,” Serena said. “Landscapes, churches, temples. I was doing it as a contemplative thing.”

Serena’s charcoal drawings are large, about 49 by 60 inches. The shrines are examples of Serena’s collage work.

To Kubitza, “Sanctuaries” is a study of the multilayered relationship between human beings and their environment, which can be a source of peace and power.

“Nature can evoke feelings of soul-nurturing retreat from social woes, yet recently, those gave way to feelings of awe and powerlessness as riverbeds flooded and fires roared,” Kubitza said.

Serena received her bachelor’s and Master of Fine Arts at UC Santa Barbara and lived in Montecito for a time before moving to Ojai, so watching the fire sweep through the two counties she called home was heartbreaking for her.

“I just got chills through my whole body at the mention of it,” Serena said. “It’s just horrifying.”

Serena hopes “Sanctuaries” reminds guests of the softer side of nature.

Serena began her career with a series of artistic collaborations at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art. These installations involved more than 600 student artists.

Later, Serena would go on to establish Women Beyond Borders (womenbeyondborders.org), which became her life’s work.

The multi-year project involved sending more than 1,000 artists in 50 countries one small wooden box each, which they made into a piece of art, then returned to Serena. Among the artistic boxes are works from more than 10,000 children, 6,500 with disabilities.

“We’re all isolated artists in our studios,” she said. “I’m very fond of collaboration. I don’t like to just walk alone as an artist. I like to walk with other artists.”

Serena considers “Sanctuaries” and “Women Beyond Borders” both as examples of her overarching art form: building community.

She is fond of quoting Japanese writer Ryunosuke Satoro, who said: “Individually, we are one drop. Together, we are an ocean.”

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CSUCI) is the only four-year, public university in Ventura County and is known for its interdisciplinary, multicultural and international perspectives, and its emphasis on experiential and service learning. CSUCI’s strong academic programs focus on business, sciences, liberal studies, teaching credentials, and innovative master’s degrees. Students benefit from individual attention, up-to-date technology, and classroom instruction augmented by outstanding faculty research. CSUCI has been designated by the U.S. Department of Education as a Hispanic-Serving Institution and is committed to serving students of all backgrounds from the region and beyond. Connect with and learn more by visiting CSUCI’s Social Media.

"Disparate Pleasures" Art Exhibit at CSU Channel Islands through December 12th

Three artists with different styles are displaying their diverse yet cohesive show, “Disparate Pleasures,” at the CSU Channel Islands (CSUCI) Napa Gallery beginning Nov. 27 with an opening from 6 to 8 p.m. on Nov. 30.

“Disparate Pleasures” opens against a backdrop of three shows already underway in Napa Hall from a CSUCI faculty member and two graduate art students.

The work of Art Lecturer Beverly Decker and graduates Vanessa Gomez and Ryan Lewis opened Nov. 6 and will run through Dec. 12 on CSUCI Grad Walls 1 and 2 and the CSUCI Palm Temporary Gallery.

“Disparate Pleasures” in the Napa Gallery features the work of three UC Santa Barbara Master of Fine Arts graduates, Marcos Christodoulou, Sunny Samuel and Peter Sowinski.

Christodoulou is a painter who finds his inspiration in myths, classic Hollywood cinema, art history, and images snatched from social media. 

Piece by Marcos Christodoulou

Piece by Marcos Christodoulou

Samuel is also a painter who deals in more abstract work involving patterns and layers and Sowinski is a sculptor who explores the use of technology, from the simplest mechanical design to a sophisticated computerized apparatus.

“I chose these three artists because they were all so different yet they seem to work so well together,” said Art Lecturer and curator Christophe Bourély, quoting a phrase the artists used about one another: “It’s as though we were three rare species of moth which had, for a brief time, gathered around a flame.”

Showing in the CSUCI Palm Temporary Gallery is “Over the Years…” by a Ventura-based association of printers including Art Lecturer Beverly Decker The hand-made prints illustrate the significance of the passage of time.

“I think of my work as a visual meditation,” said Decker, who has been a member of the Inkspots for six years. “I am inspired by my life, including the study of Eastern and Western philosophy and mysticism.”

Paper is Vanessa Gomez’s muse. The CSUCI 2017 Art graduate’s show, “I Lack the Words to Say…” is an exploration of her experience as a musician and how some lyrics to songs can be feelings or thoughts that someone may wish to communicate, but don’t have the right words to fully express them.

Gomez’s show consists of prints that she has created with paper, including paper sculpture, paintings, collages, and weavings. Gomez’s show will be on CSUCI Grad Wall 1.

“I love the feel of paper and how delicate it can be while also being a platform of a striking image,” Gomez said.

On CSUCI Grad Wall 2 is “What’s Your Sign?” by 2017 Art graduate Ryan Lewis, who exhibits digital paintings showing his personal interpretations of astrological signs.

For more information, visit: https://art.csuci.edu/exhibitions/.

Limited parking is available on campus with the purchase of a $6 daily permit; follow signs to the parking permit dispensers. Free parking is available at the Camarillo Metrolink Station/Lewis Road with bus service to and from the campus.  Riders should board the CSUCI Vista Bus to the campus; the cash-only fare is $1.25 each way. Buses arrive and depart from the Camarillo Metrolink Station every 30 minutes from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Friday. For exact times, check the schedule at www.goventura.org.

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CSUCI) is the only four-year, public university in Ventura County and is known for its interdisciplinary, multicultural and international perspectives, and its emphasis on experiential and service learning. CSUCI’s strong academic programs focus on business, sciences, liberal studies, teaching credentials, and innovative master’s degrees. Students benefit from individual attention, up-to-date technology, and classroom instruction augmented by outstanding faculty research. CSUCI has been designated by the U.S. Department of Education as a Hispanic-Serving Institution and is committed to serving students of all backgrounds from the region and beyond. Connect with and learn more by visiting CSUCI’s Social Media.

"Patterns of Nature" Art Exhibit at Santa Monica Mountains Visitor Center 11/2 to 12/28

Bold Colors and Patterns Dominate at Upcoming Santa Monica Mountains Art Exhibit

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When artist Lesley Goren moved to Topanga, she picked up a new hobby: trail running. The sport was so addicting that she altogether stopped making art, which was usually focused on architecture. After hundreds of miles of running in the Santa Monica Mountains, however, she eventually found her next subject, and it was in front of her the whole time: wildflowers, sages, and chaparral. That native plant-focused work, a mixed media bouquet of bold gouache colors and digital processing, will be on display and for sale at the Santa Monica Mountains Interagency Visitor Center from November 2 through December 28 in an exhibit called Patterns of Nature.

“While running the trails, I had an epiphany that everything I need is in the mountains,” explained Goren, who then started a project called 100 Days of Native Plants on her Instagram account. “It helped me figure everything out: artistically, emotionally, spiritually, and physically. I also feel we need to do our part to speak for the land.”

The public can meet Goren at an artist’s reception on Saturday, December 2, from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. A portion of the funds from sales of her original work and prints will be donated to continue arts in the park.

The visitor center is located at King Gillette Ranch, 26876 Mulholland Highway, Calabasas. For more information, call 805-370-2302.

Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (SMMNRA) is the largest urban national park in the country, encompassing more than 150,000 acres of mountains and coastline in Ventura and Los Angeles counties. A unit of the National Park Service, it comprises a seamless network of local, state and federal parks interwoven with private lands and communities. As one of only five Mediterranean ecosystems in the world, SMMNRA preserves the rich biological diversity of more than 450 animal species and 26 distinct plant communities. For more information, visit www.nps.gov/samo.

Three Artists' Work Highlighted at Buenaventura Gallery October 11 to November 11

El Capitan Beach  by Lorna Amundson

El Capitan Beach by Lorna Amundson

Gallery’s shows highlight three artists

Three Oxnard artists — photographers Julianne Martin and Tomi Murphy and watercolorist Lorna Amundson — will be featured in individual shows Oct. 10-Nov. 11 at the Buenaventura Gallery in downtown Ventura.

All three women plan to attend an opening reception 5-7 p.m. Oct. 14 at the gallery.

Martin’s “Other Worlds” photos and Murphy’s “Faces” will be displayed in the Clophine Dooley Gallery; Amundson’s “Transparent Watercolors. Yosemite to the Central Coast” will cover the Buenaventura Art Association’s red gallery walls.

Martin, who called herself “a new exhibiting photographer,” said she has shown her work for only a couple of years and earned several awards, but has taken pictures for many years and has a “huge library of photos.” She will show 15-20 framed photographs and have additional prints available.

“My general theme is a focus on the beauty of nature. This show emphasizes a wider variety of unique and unusual settings that evoke the imagination,” Martin said. “More recently, I have delved into night photography, creatively working with very long exposure times, and have interesting and unique photos.”

Murphy also will have about 20 photos on display and offer photo books for sale. She has been creating fine art photography for 11 years, portraiture is her specialty, and said, “This show is literately about faces, people I met in the last 10-15 years who impressed me.”

The challenge, she said, is “producing images that do not look like snapshots or staged portraits. … I don’t artificially manufacture scenes to achieve the images I desire — I just never stop looking for beauty as I live my life.”

Amundson plans to hang about 25 framed paintings, have an equal number unframed, and offer dozens of different cards. Her show will include landscapes and seascapes, most painted on location in Yosemite and along the Central Coast of California.

She studied biology and botany, earned a degree in parasitology, and was on the faculty of Southeast Missiouri State University for 10 years before moving to California in 1974. Amundson said she took up painting in her mid-50s, began painting more regularly in her late 60s, is largely self-taught, and worked exclusively en plain air until this year, when she began trying different approaches, “using photographs or just making it up.

“My favorite part of watercolor is when quick, strategic strokes of just the right degree of color and wetness work magic, capture the essence of where and what I am seeing, and don’t get screwed up later,” she said.

Works by many other BAA members will be presented in the remaining gallery space during these shows, after which the nonprofit will offer its annual Holiday Boutique in late November and December.

Buenaventura Gallery, 700 E. Santa Clara St., Ventura, is open 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesdays through Sundays. For more about the Buenaventura Art Association, a 63-year-old artists cooperative, and its programs, visit www.buenaventuragallery.org or call 648-1235 during gallery hours.

LA/LAndscapes: Real and Imagined Exhibit at Studio Channel Islands through November 18

Studio Channel Islands Presents LA/LAndscapes: Real and Imagined

Death Valley Salt Flats by artist Linda Vallejo

Death Valley Salt Flats by artist Linda Vallejo

Studio Channel Islands invites you to experience the landscape in which we live through the eyes of seven exceptional artists. LA/LAndscapes: Real and Imagined is a contemporary art exhibition exploring the themes and traditions of landscape painting, both north and south of the Mexico/USA border. The exhibition will open Sept. 16, Mexico’s Independence Day, with an opening reception, at 1 p.m., including honored guest, Consul Roberto Rodriguez from the Mexican Consulate in Oxnard, and several of the artists. Live music by String Quartet, "INEFABLE," from Guanajuato, Mexico. Studio Channel Islands is located at 2222 E. Ventura Blvd., Camarillo.

Today, nearly half the population of Los Angeles has roots in Latin America and yet the voice of the Latino and Latin American artist is under represented in our theaters, galleries and museums. In response to this gap, the Getty has initiated an extensive collaboration of over 70 cultural organizations from San Diego to Santa Barbara to take a fresh look at the vital and vibrant traditions in Latino and Latin American art.

“LA/LAndscapes: Real and Imagined is Studio Channel Islands’ response to the Getty's Pacific Standard Time project and the beginning of a larger program of exhibitions that explore the connections within our community and celebrate the diverse perspectives of people who share this land,” said Peter Tyas, Studio Channel Islands’ executive director. The Getty's 'Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA' project is a far-reaching and ambitious exploration of Latin American and Latino art in dialogue with Los Angeles.

LA/LAndscapes: Real and Imagined includes work by two artists from Mexico, José Maria Castelao and Manuela Generali, and three artists from California, Linda Vallejo, Fernanda Uski and Porfirio Guiterrez. During the LA/LAndscapes exhibition, Studio Channel Islands will also present two exhibitions of photography; first a series of portraits of the people and landscapes of Mexico by John Lewis and second a series of studies of Ventura’s field workers by Antonio Juarez.  

LA/LAndscapes: Real and Imagined will be on exhibit at the Blackboard Gallery through Nov. 18. Admission is free. Sponsors of LA/LAndscapes: Real and Imagined include Dr. and Mrs. F. Joseph Halcomb III, M.D., the California Arts Council and Consulado de Mexico en Oxnard. The Blackboard Gallery at Studio Channel Islands is open Tuesday to Friday 11am to 5pm and Saturday 11am to 3pm. For more information, visit www.studiochannelislands.org or call 805.383.1368.

About Studio Channel Islands

Studio Channel Islands is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting and preserving the arts in our community, providing unique and diverse artistic encounters for all ages and extraordinary opportunities for artists. Ongoing programs include open studios and arts education classes, diverse Blackboard Gallery exhibitions and performances, cultural festivals and Old Town Camarillo events. Gallery hours are Tues.– Fri., 11 a.m.–5 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.–3 p.m. Located at 2222 E. Ventura Blvd., Camarillo. For more information, visit www.studiochannelislands.org, or call 805-383-1368.

The Avalanche and The Silence Art Exhibit at Carnegie Art Museum 9/10-11/19, 2017

Carnegie Art Museum Announces Fall Exhibition
The Avalanche and The Silence New Works by Linda Arreola
September 10 - November 19, 2017


Influenced by the architecture of Mesoamerica and the sleek lines of modernist design, Linda Arreola investigates geometric spatial arrangements using an elemental and minimalist sensibility. Arreloa’s explorations using geometric abstraction create what she calls spiritual structural environments. As with the experience she had upon seeing the pyramids of Teotihuacan for the first time, ‘I want to create work that gives the viewer a perspective that connects them to a much grander whole”. With this in mind and having a background in sculpture and architecture, she thinks of her paintings as built rather than rendered. Line, color and form are her elemental building blocks from which she creates these abstract environments.

With this new series, The Avalanche and the Silence,  Arreloa is venturing into the territory of duality. It is the first time she has worked with two distinct concepts simultaneously. Though the inspiration arose out of the present day experience of our human condition, this duality signifies the hopeful reminder found in opposing positions that creates an equilibrium and ultimately fosters regeneration.

OPENING RECEPTION
Saturday, September 9 4-6 pm
$10 / members free
Reception sponsored by The Arts Collaborative

Also opening:
Collecting/California Latino Art
Selected works of California Latino art from the Carnegie’s Collection will be shown including the 21ft History of the Chicano Movimiento by Frank Romero, recently returned from his retrospective at the Museum of Latin American Art, Long Beach. Carnegie’s focus on collecting Latino Art began in 1994 with a group exhibition curated by Frank Romero.

The Fall exhibits honor, but are not a part of, the Getty’s Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA ambitious exploration of Latin American and Latino Art in LA being exhibited at art institutions throughout Southern California

Location: 424 South C Street, Oxnard. 805.385.8254 www.carnegieam.org

Exposed: The Female Lens in a Post-Identity Era? Exhibit at California Museum of Art Thousand Oaks Sept 7 to Dec 9, 2017

Exposed: The Female Lens in a Post-Identity Era?

California Museum of Art Thousand Oaks
September 7 to December 9, 2017
Wednesday - Saturdays
12PM - 4PM

Opening Reception: September 7, 2017 at 7PM

Part of Femmes Photo Fest Art Crawl

Photographic examination of identity through the artistry of some of the most compelling female photographers
working in California today.

Jo Ann Callis
Arden Surdam
Gay Ribisi
Andréanne Michon
Sant Khalsa
Sandra Klein

Curated by:
Lynn Farrand
Laura PG Lewis

Femmes Photo Fest Continues at
Four Friends Gallery with images from the Janss Collection

Location: 1948 Thousand Oaks Boulevard, Thousand Oaks

www.cmato.org

Three Concurrent Solo Exhibits at Buenaventura Gallery August 1 to September 2

“Cook Inlet, Alaska” by Kimberly-Ann Talbert

“Cook Inlet, Alaska” by Kimberly-Ann Talbert

Three Buenaventura Art Association members dedicated to sharing their perceptual insights will present recent artworks Aug. 1-Sept. 2 in concurrent solo exhibitions at the Buenaventura Gallery in downtown Ventura.

Mark Hafeman’s “Magic Garden” will be on the main gallery’s red walls, while Fredda Leiter’s “Birds, Beasts, Figures, Sky” and Kimberly-Ann Talbert’s “The World Through My Eyes” will fill the Clophine Dooley Gallery. The artists plan to attend an opening reception 5-7 p.m. Aug. 5.

Hafeman, an Oxnard painter whose mother and grandmother also were artists, said he will show about two dozen pieces, both watercolors and oils with acrylic underpainting.

“This show is focused on the beauty of nature as seen by my watercolors of flowers, my plein-air landscape scenes of mountains, rivers and ponds,” he said. “I am interested in showing the seemingly ordinary as magical and dynamic.”

Leiter plans to have about 18 watercolors on paper in her show. She lives in Ventura, has been painting about nine years, and enjoys “watercolors’ surprises,” she said. Her subjects include “whatever appeals to my eye and heart: An expression or gesture, the play of light and shadow, colors and shapes of skies and landscapes.”

Talbert is a lifelong artist who lives in Los Angeles and will be showing digital photographs and handmade jewelry, perhaps 30 pieces.

“The photos are of how I view the world around me and those that I find awe-inspiring and interesting and beautiful,” she said, adding that her favorite part of creating art is “being able to share the beauty of the everyday world with others.”

All three featured artists have examples of their works online: Hafeman at markhafemanfinearts.com, Leiter at freddaleiter.art, and Talbert at kimberlyann-talbert.pixels.com.

An exhibition by association members will fill the remainder of the main gallery, along with a hallway display by the last show’s honorable mention winners Louisa Wallace Jacobs and Doug Fossati.

Buenaventura Gallery, 700 E. Santa Clara St., Ventura, is open 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesdays through Sundays. For more information, visit BAA’s website, www.buenaventuragallery.org, or call 648-1235 during gallery hours.

Summer Art Exhibit at Carnegie Art Museum in Oxnard "Soluble Power" June 11 to August 20

Contemporary approaches in SoCal Art using the medium of water color are showcased in Soluble Power on display at the Carnegie Art Museum from June 11- August 20, 2017. It features the art of Gary Brewer of Los Angeles, Gail Faulkner of Ventura, Joanne Julian of Oxnard, Mona Neuhaus of Oxnard, Paul Pitsker of Santa Monica and Doug Shoemaker recently of Palm Springs.

Ground pigment suspended in water is one of the oldest mediums known, waning and rising in popularity with changes is technology over the centuries. California artists excelling in both oil painting and watercolor burst out from 1925-1955 with a new a popular approach for watercolor that was quintessentially Californian and was named The California Style. Gone was the pencil detailed English approach, replaced with using large sheets of paper, sweeping free brush strokes, bold color and strong, quick lines. Although currently more paintings in acrylic and oil seem to be commonly displayed, Southern California artists’ experimentation with watercolor to push it to depict contemporary visions continues unarrested.

Gary Brewer captures the rich universe of complex life forms, sharing how they engage and excite the mind. A self-taught artist, his fascination with the natural world began in the Mojave Desert where he was raised and has gone on to have works in a variety of mediums exhibited in galleries and museums in New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Gail Faulkner’s works amazingly convey the richness of old master oil paintings but with the reflections and fresh hues of watercolor. Following a career in the medical field, Faulkner attended the Philadelphia College of Art and the Sanski Art Center in Haddonfield, New Jersey. Among her numerous awards are first place in the 2008 California Gold Coast Watercolor Society.

Decades of drawing, painting and printmaking have provided Joanne Julian a foundation for watercolor works. Presently her methodology for watercolor does not differ from her approaches to other media. Mandatory are paying attention and being in the moment. Also pacing, timing, control or lack of it, and with watercolor, liquidity and the weather play a role in the artist’s outcome.

A traditional landscape painter at heart, Mona Neuhaus paints primarily in the media of soft pastel and in watercolor. The often rugged and wide open scenes of America’s, and especially California’s, country side provide her limitless inspiration. Neuhaus’ works are in the Museum of Ventura County’s “Bank of A. Levy Corporate Collection” and the Collection of Jackson Wheeler (often a lender to the Carnegie Art Museum) as well as in corporate and private collections throughout the United States, Mexico and Japan.

Because the watercolor medium is transparent and its materials vulnerable when being applied, Paul Pitsker has been inspired to use it for transparent, fragile and vulnerable subjects. A key goal for Pitsker is to make paintings that do not look like traditional watercolors by incorporating uncustomary effects like an intense velvety black for backgrounds. Growing up the artist’s family lived in a wildlife sanctuary in New England. At the nearby sanctuary visitor center, Pitsker was allowed to draw by the hour and to photograph the small museum’s mounted bird specimens, laying the rudimentary ground work of his process today. Despite his early art interest, he majored in mathematics at Pomona College in Claremont. Pursuing art seriously after graduation, Pitsker took courses in drawing, watercolor painting, and completed an independent mentor program at Santa Monica College.

Realist painter, Doug Shoemaker, works in his chosen medium of watercolor to explore the richness and complexity of everyday, ordinary objects in our urban and natural
environment. Elements of the built and natural environment, often abandoned or decaying in sunlight and shadow inspire the artist to create meaningful images where the ordinary becomes memorable. Trained as an architect at Lawrence Technological University, Shoemaker advanced his interests in painting and drawing en plein air at the Cranbrook Academy and in intaglio printmaking at the Fort Mason Art Center in San Francisco. In 2015 he was selected as a Joshua Tree National Park Artist-in-Residence affording the opportunity to alter his focus from the urban to the rural environment. His work was a part of the Artists Council Exhibition at the Palm Springs Museum of Art in 2013 and 2014. This summer Shoemaker’s recent paintings will be exhibited at Skidmore Contemporary Art at Bergamot Station in Santa Monica.

Opening Reception: Saturday, June 10, 4 -6 pm$10 / members free

Carnegie Art Museum, 424 South C Street, Oxnard
805.385.8254 www.carnegieam.org

"The Secret Paintings" Exhibit at Museum of Ventura County June 2 to August 6

The Museum of Ventura County launches the summer season with an opening reception for The Secret Paintings, unveiling the works of local artist Michael Pearce, 6-8 p.m., June 2, at the Museum, 100 Main Street, Ventura. Following the opening ceremony, patrons can view the collected works and have the opportunity to meet and speak with the artist in person. Admission to the Museum and reception is free for Free First Friday.

For this exhibit, Pearce has selected 35 works of art, for which he took inspiration from Renaissance and Pre-Raphaelite masters. With The Secret Paintings, Pearce seeks to emulate their ambitiousness and scale, which is reflected in the centerpiece of the exhibition: a monumental four-part work of oil on canvas themed for the summer solstice.

The Secret Paintings will be on display at the Museum through August 6. The museum hosts Free First Sundays as well as Appreciation Weekends with free admission for featured groups. Visit venturamuseum.org for a full schedule of free admission days.

Three Concurrent Art Exhibits at Buenaventura Gallery in Ventura May 23-June 24, 2017

Monterey Coast, north view.

Monterey Coast, north view.

Works by Ojai painter Kathy Bodycombe and Ventura printmaker and photographer Christina Altfeld will be featured May 23-June 24 at the Buenaventura Gallery.

Their shows will share wall space in the Clophine Dooley Gallery as the rest of the downtown Ventura gallery is devoted to Buenaventura Art Association’s fifth annual Collage Open Competition. A reception for all three exhibitions will be 5-7 p.m. May 27, at which awards for the collage show will be announced.

Bodycombe’s “Duets” show will have oil-on-canvas landscapes from places she has lived or visited on both U.S. coasts and in Europe, ranging in size from 6 inches square to 24 by 36 inches. She has been painting for 15 years.

“I have pairs of two paintings that are similar in size, subject and style that complement each other,” she said. “The pairs share a location for the subject, share the same size format and style, but differ in composition.”

Altfeld, a lifelong photographer who’s also been exploring multiple forms of printmaking for 10 years, chose “Ocean Atmosphere” as her title. She uses polymer metal intaglio plates and paper lithography to create pieces hand-printed on an etching press and further hand-paints many of them. She also will present some cyanotype original prints and plans to have about 20 pieces, from 8 inches square to 14 by 24 inches.

“Living near the ocean’s edge, I spend time walking on the beach both in the morning and often at sunset time. I have been watching the sea kelp being washed up on the shore knowing I wanted to use it somehow in my work,” Altfeld said. “This show presented the perfect opportunity to create a new series inspired by my walks by the sea.”

The Collage Open Competition will have two- and three-dimensional original glued collage, mixed-media collage or assemblage artworks, of which at least half must be glued collage.

Judging the entries will be Kathy Leader, who grew up and received her art and art education degrees in South Africa and now teaches privately and in workshops in her West Los Angeles studio. First-, second- and third-place awards will be $300, $200 and $100, and winners of those and honorable mentions will also get one-year memberships to BAA.  

The Buenaventura Gallery, 700 E. Santa Clara St., Ventura, is open 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesdays through Sundays. For more about the nonprofit Buenaventura Art Association and its programs, visit www.buenaventuragallery.org or call 648-1235 during gallery hours.

“Forward: CLUFest 2017" Exhibit at Kwan Fong Gallery at Cal Lutheran 4/21 to 5/14

Robots, virtual reality and interactive projections will be part of CLUFest 2017, a California Lutheran University exhibit highlighting multimedia students’ work with cutting-edge technology.

“Forward: CLUFest 2017” will run from April 21 through May 14 in Kwan Fong Gallery of Art and Culture on the Thousand Oaks campus. A reception will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. Saturday, April 22.

The 13 graduating seniors in the multimedia capstone class planned and curated “Forward” to explore technological growth through unconventional uses of design and storytelling. It highlights the work of students of all class levels majoring and minoring in multimedia by showing their capabilities as emerging innovators in design, gaming, cinema, visual effects and interactive media.

Unique features of this year’s exhibit will include a demonstration of robots designed by computer science students, an interactive projection on the floor that responds to motion, and a student-designed virtual reality space. An upside-down-room photo booth created by the capstone students gives the illusion of standing on the ceiling. Other features include videos and projected artworks.

For a series titled “Rewind,” each of the capstone students re-created one of their earlier works to show how their skills have developed in a range of specialties during their years at Cal Lutheran.

The capstone students are Audrey Askegard of Simi Valley, Matthew Bianchi of Granada Hills, Jordan Bowlby of Alpharetta, Georgia, Tyler Chinappi of Oak Park, Tyler Graper of Simi Valley, Will Houser of Bainbridge Island, Washington, Joey Luau of East Los Angeles, Allyssa Moscotte of Granada Hills, Alexandria Pico of Saugus, Nikki Snook of Simi Valley, Jacob Steagall of Thousand Oaks, Morgan Terhar of Bothell, Washington, and Kevin Zucker of Thousand Oaks.

The gallery is located in the Soiland Humanities Center at 120 Memorial Parkway. It is open to the public from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Parking is available at the corner of Olsen Road and Mountclef Boulevard.

Cal Lutheran’s Multimedia Department is sponsoring the free exhibition. For more information, contact Tim Hengst at 805-493-3241 or thengst@callutheran.edu.

"Painting the Sky" - The Kites of Tyrus Wong at Malibu City Hall April 2 - July 28, 2017

The Malibu Cultural Arts Commission’s next public art installation “Painting the Sky: The Kites of Tyrus Wong,” opens Sunday, April 2 in Malibu City Hall.

Wong, who passed away on December 30, 2016 at the age of 106, was one of the most celebrated Chinese-American artists of the 20th century. He was a Hollywood studio artist, painter, printmaker, calligrapher, greeting-card illustrator and, in later years, maker of unique elegant kites.

The exhibit will be on display from April 2 to July 28, 2017 in the City Hall Atrium. The opening reception on Sunday, April 2, 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM, will feature a screening of a documentary about the artist and an exhibit of photographs of his kites.

The documentary, “Tyrus,” written and directed by Pamela Tom, is an in-depth portrait of the life and enduring impact of Wong, taking viewers on a journey from his birthplace in Guangzhou, China in 1910, to the boarding houses of L.A.’s old Chinatown and the studios of the Golden Age of Hollywood. The film will be screened at 3:00 PM and has a 73-minute running time.

Photographs from Sara Jane Boyers’ collection “Go Fly a Kite: Saturdays at the Beach with Tyrus Wong” will be on display in City Hall during the exhibition.

Wong’s career took off while working at Disney where, as a landscape painter, his talent was put to work creating the look and style for Disney’s classic animated feature “Bambi.” He then moved to Warner Bros. Studios where he worked for over 30 years as a pre-production illustrator on dozens of live-action films including “The Sands of Iwo Jima,” “Rebel Without a Cause” and “The Wild Bunch.”

After retiring, Wong re-discovered his childhood love of flying kites. He designed and hand made hundreds of kites using bamboo, rattan, nylon and string. He would fill the sky at the beach in Santa Monica with his whimsical creations: flocks of butterflies, owls, cranes, and swallows, schools of fish, a panda, and on windy days, a 100-foot- long centipede.

For more information visit MalibuArtsandCulture.org/Kites or call (310) 456-2489 ext. 337.

“Personal Stories/Shared Narratives” Art Exhibit at CSU Channel Islands 3/1 to 4/2

The work of Los Angeles artists Lesley Krane and Cecilia Z. Miguez will be on display from March 1 through April 2 at the John Spoor Broome Library Gallery on the CSU Channel Islands (CSUCI) campus.

The opening reception of “Personal Stories/Shared Narratives” will be March 7 from 5 to 6:30 p.m. in the Broome Gallery with both artists giving short presentations about their work.

Krane, who also teaches art at CSU Northridge, expresses herself through photography and Miguez, a Uruguay-born artist, uses sculpture, but exhibit curator Irina D. Costache, Ph.D. saw a connection between their styles and put together “Personal Stories/Shared Narratives.”

Krane’s work in “Personal Stories” is a series of photographs of white rooms meant to depict private spaces we all need.

Krane’s process involves shooting film (yes, film — not digital images) on a toy camera she has used for years. She double exposes black and white film by shooting her photos, then running the film back through the camera while shooting clouds. 

Figures are part of Cecilia Miguez’s work, but there is an abstract element that distinguishes her work, which is often in wood, bronze, iron and/or glass.

Limited parking is available on campus with the purchase of a $6 daily permit; follow signs to the parking permit dispensers. Free parking is available at the Camarillo Metrolink Station/Lewis Road with bus service to and from the campus.  Riders should board the CSUCI Vista Bus to the campus; the cash-only fare is $1.25 each way. Buses arrive and depart from the Camarillo Metrolink Station every 30 minutes from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Friday. For exact times, check the schedule at www.goventura.org.

California Fibers:Time Exhibit at Studio Channel Islands in Camarillo April 1 - May 6, 2017

The Studio Channel Islands Blackboard Gallery is pleased to presentCalifornia Fibers:Time from April 1 – May 6, 2017, with an opening reception on April 1st from 4-6 PM.

California Fibers:Time  features the work ofseventeen members of California Fibers- Linda Anderson, Charlotte Bird, Ashley Blalock, Carrie Burckle, Doshi, Gail Fraser, Polly Jacobs Giacchina,  Lynne Hodgman, Chari Myers, Kathy Nida, Michael Rohde, Mary Beth Schwartzenberger, Rebecca Smith, Cameron Taylor-Brown, Lydia Tjioe Hall, Peggy Weidemann and Lori Zimmerman.

All works in the exhibit address the theme of “Time” as interpreted by each artist.  For example, Linda Anderson describes her work Becoming as a rite of passage“marking a moment of maturation…and… two boys experiencing that moment in time.”  Kathy Nida deals with “time’s increasing speed and its toll on living things as we age…”  Peggy Weidemann views time as “much more than a clock…it is ever changing…and can live in our memories as well as the present and influence our future.” Mary Beth Schwartzenberger ‘s work Inscription places “our human experiences of today next to people from so long ago (as) a thoughtful reminder that we as humans are…more the same than different.”  Lydia Tjioe Hall’s series One a Day began the year after her daughter was born. “Knowing that I would not have much time to work on larger pieces, I decided to work on small pieces that would add up to a larger installation in the end.”

Ashley Blalock

Ashley Blalock

A gallery walkthrough is scheduled on Thursday, April 6, at 5:30 PM with Michael Rohde, and a panel discussion with moderator Katherine Cooksey and panelists Carrie Burckle,  Mary Beth Schwartzenberger, Cameron Taylor-Brown and Lori Zimmerman is planned for Saturday, April 22 at 1 PM.

California Fibers:Time will run through May 6, 2017. Artists will be present at the opening on April 1 from 4-6 PM. The Channel Islands Blackboard Gallery is located at2222 East Ventura Blvd., Camarillo. Gallery hours are Tuesday – Friday from 11-5 PM and Saturday from 11-3 PM.  For more information contact Katherine Cooksey, Gallery Director, at 805-383-1368 or at kcooksey@studiochannelislands.org

THE STUDIO CHANNEL ISLANDS BLACKBOARD GALLERY studiochannelislands.org

Studio Channel Islands is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to advancing the creative life of Old Town Camarillo and the communities within Ventura County, fostering connections between artists and visitors, and celebrating the cultural identity of our community. Ongoing programs include Artists-In-Residence open studios, arts education classes, diverse Blackboard Gallery exhibitions, cultural events, festivals, and much more. The Blackboard Gallery is the largest gallery in Ventura County and features artists from around the world.        

CALIFORNIA FIBERS californiafibers.com

California Fibers, founded in 1970, supports artistic growth and professional advancement for contemporary Southern California fiber artists. The imagination and superb craftsmanship of these artists place them in the highest echelons of their fields. The group has an extensive exhibition history in the USA and abroad. Many of its members are well-represented in museums and private collections and are recipients of prestigious awards from around the world. Their creative expression includes weaving, basketry, sculpture, quilting, embroidery, felting, surface design, knitting, crochet, wearables, and mixed media. 

"Defying Darkness" Exhibit at Carnegie Art Museum in Oxnard March 12 to May 21, 2017

Joanne Julian’s newest exhibition Defying Darkness at the Carnegie Art Museum in Oxnard, California traces in over 30 graphite and sumi ink drawings the development in her recent work of a rising fascination for the impacts and subtly iridescent atmosphere of darkness. The artist’s growing understanding and facility with contrasting peacefully white voids with energizing splashes of black has deepened, until now the beauty of darkness has itself become the setting.

Budding evidences of this dark visual challenge in hindsight appears throughout her various series and is displayed in a few, early hinting samples from Julian’s Zen Circles and Botanicals Series. The fascination and investigation, however, hits full stride in recent works in her Fish, Clouds and Skies, and particularly Birds and Feather Series. In these latter, the use of darkness and cropping lends a floating, unanchored, almost celestial quality to the creatures depicted. Yet all are represented with the elegant sparseness that Julian has become noted for over her 30 year career. Coupled with the large –scale of the drawings, Defying Darkness wraps viewers in a quietly dramatic experience.

Joanne Julian was born in Los Angeles. She received her BA and MA degrees in sculpture and printmaking from California State University, Northridge and her MFA degree in painting from Otis Art Institute of Parsons School of Design. For 34 years she was a full-time faculty member at College of the Canyons in Valencia, California, during which time she was also a half-time faculty member at California State University Northridge. Having studied and traveled in Asia, the influence of Zen Buddhist aesthetics has been noted as an undercurrent in Julian’s art.

 

The artist has had over 20 solo exhibitions and been featured in 60 group exhibitions nationally.  Among these have been exhibitions at: Jan Baum Gallery in Los Angeles, Thomas Babeor Gallery in La Jolla, Laguna Beach Museum of Art, Newport Harbor Art Museum, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and in 2015 California State University Northridge. Public collections of her work include:  Atlantic Richfield, Bank of America, Grand Wailea Resort, Home Savings of America, The Irvine Company, Nestle, Nikko, Price Waterhouse, and Teneco Oil.

Joanne Julian will give an Artist’s Gallery Talk at Carnegie Art Museum in Oxnard on March 30th at 6:30pm. An exhibition catalog with essay by Meher McArthur is available. For additional information, see carnegieam.org and joannejulian.com.

Location:  Carnegie Art Museum/424 South C Street/ Oxnard 805.385.8157 carnegieam.org

Hours: Thurs- Sat 10am-5pm & Sun 1-5pm.  Closed holidays and during exhibit installation.

Art Exhibit at Cal Lutheran Explores the Myth of Arcadia February 3 through April 6, 2017

David Ligare’s oil painting “Et in Arcadia Ego”

David Ligare’s oil painting “Et in Arcadia Ego”

Contemporary approaches to the age-old myth of Arcadia will be the focus of an exhibit in the William Rolland Gallery of Fine Art at California Lutheran University.

“Et in Arcadia Ego” will run from Friday, Feb. 3, through Thursday, April 6, on the Thousand Oaks campus. Curator David Molesky of Brooklyn will lead tours of the exhibit at 8:45 a.m., 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 9. An opening reception will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 11.

The exhibition explores the idea of Arcadia, a place of rural peace and simplicity, as it has been reinterpreted and reinvented through the eyes of contemporary artists. The featured artists all work with Arcadian themes such as idealized landscape, contemplation of mortality and what it means to be human in the temporal world while standing on the precipice of the next world.

Highlights include works from renowned Norwegian figurative painter Odd Nerdrum and Los Angeles artists Sandow Birk and Astrid Preston. Other featured artists include former NASA engineer Kim Keever, who photographs complex miniature scenes that he builds underwater; Brad Kunkle, who places idyllic images of figures in autumn forest landscapes; and David Ligare, who is known for his pastoral paintings. Other participating artists are Agostino Arrivabene, Seamus Conley, Julie Heffernan, Maria Kreyn, Holly Lane, Stephanie Peek, Gillian Pederson-Krag, Aron Wiesenfeld, Robin F. Williams and Jason Yarmosky.

The exhibit was inspired by and named for a 17th-century painting by Nicolas Poussin. “Et in Arcadia Ego” can be translated, “Even in Arcadia, there am I,” an ambiguous phrase that may allude to impermanence of the ideal and death. A work attributed to Poussin, “Promised Land,” will be featured in the exhibit.

Molesky curated the exhibit and organized it in conjunction with the New Museum Los Gatos. The internationally recognized fine artist is known for his landscapes and figurative works. His paintings have been exhibited in museums throughout the world including the Baltimore Museum of Art, Pasinger Fabrik in Germany, Casa dell’Architettura in Italy and Telemarksgalleriet in Norway.

Admission to the exhibit and events is free.

The gallery is in William Rolland Stadium, which is located north of Olsen Road near Mountclef Boulevard. It is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. For more information, contact Rachel T. Schmid at 805-493-3697 or rollandgallery@callutheran.edu or visit CalLutheran.edu/rolland.